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Ben Carson keep$ it all in the Family. He had to give up a $31,000 table paid by taxpayers


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‘Using his position for private gain’: Ben Carson was warned he might run afoul of ethics rules by enlisting his son

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/using-his-position-for-private-gain-hud-lawyers-warned-ben-carson-risked-running-afoul-of-ethics-rules-by-enlisting-son/2018/01/31/bb20c48e-0532-11e8-8777-2a059f168dd2_story.html?utm_term=.6983e3cfdbbd

 

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And now besides being a hypocrite, he's a crook.

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

Ignore list: WilliamM

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Another one in the Trump Administration. It is hard to keep up. Because they are being rotated out much quicker than at the beginning of the Administration (took almost a month for Flynn to be booted) I bet Carson will be gone in a couple of weeks. It is pretty surprising that it is Trump's own officials that tattled on Carson.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC] Make America Sane Again

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Another one in the Trump Administration. It is hard to keep up. Because they are being rotated out much quicker than at the beginning of the Administration (took almost a month for Flynn to be booted) I bet Carson will be gone in a couple of weeks. It is pretty surprising that it is Trump's own officials that tattled on Carson.

The biggest crook is still there.

Nobody's free until everybody's free - Fannie Lou Hamer

 

Avatar courtesy of Chomiji; character drawn by Kazuya Minekura

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  • 4 weeks later...
Holy Cow! I've seen more impressive looking tables in cafeterias.

hud-1-ht-er-180227_4x3_384.jpg Photo supplied to ABC News by HUD

 

As we all know the HUD needs to be as fancy as possible... LOL

 

Dr. Carson came a long way from a housing project, food stamps and affordable action, but that was good for him, that's slavery and socialism for others. Hypocrisy, our national sin!

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

Ignore list: WilliamM

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Slavery? Kinda bold terminology on a very sensitive subject.

 

Talk to him... that's he has said about the same social programs that helped him, yet are enslaving others. He also said Obamacare is worst than slavery...

 

He said it. I disagree with him.

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

Ignore list: WilliamM

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The good Doctor Carson found tax payer money is easier to remove than a brain tumor.

Whoever would have guessed that a TV reality star with no government experience, 6 bankruptcies, 5 children from 3 different marriages, 11 charges of sexual assault, 4,000+ lawsuits would turn out this bad?

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It's funny. One way to quip about something that's simpler than it seems is to say "it's not brain surgery."

 

I'm guessing that Carson may actually be ONLY capable of brain surgery - because clearly any sort of common sense thinking evades him completely.

 

What a fucking idiot.

 

The good Doctor Carson found tax payer money is easier to remove than a brain tumor.

 

Maybe he's bad at math... well, he lived out taxpayers' money: housing, food stamps, affirmative action, etc. Good habits die hard.

 

(for yinz who don't get it, that was sarcasm directed at his hypocrisy)

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

Ignore list: WilliamM

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I know someone who was part of a local panel asked to come to Washington to speak with HUD about mental health treatment practices, management of third-party facilities, and coordination with public housing. The panel was not expecting this, but almost an entire day was spent in a meeting with Dr. Carson. This panel member has made a career of developing policy and procedures for oversight and management of mental health care and facilities, and for coordination with the state. He had the following feedback:

 

Hours of the meeting were wasted because Carson is ridiculously soft-spoken. At the head of a conference table for twelve people, in a small room with decent acoustics, Carson would speak in that heavenly whisper, reclined in his chair slowly gesturing with a confident smile. The people seated to his immediate left and right could barely hear him. Two down it was hit or miss, and beyond that it was a lost cause. Two of his staff members were present, and would occasionally remind Dr. Carson to speak a bit louder. He'd laugh as if it were some sort of pet peeve or in-joke with the staff, then he would enunciate so that half of the room could hear him -- for one or two minutes. This went on for five or six hours. Occasionally someone would ask Carson to repeat something, but he rarely raised his voice long enough to broadcast his entire point. About two hours in the panel and Carson's staff members gave up on prodding Carson to speak up. My acquaintance was two down from Carson. He reported that most of the discussion took place between Carson and the four people closest to him. In the beginning they'd try to repeat Carson's questions or points to bring in other panel members, especially if one of the more distant attendees was the subject matter expert. It grew frustrating to do so. In addition, while one of the closer panel members at the table was repeating a point to engage another member further down the table Carson would lean back and continue speaking toward the ceiling. Eventually, when people didn't hear his questions Carson would answer for himself using his powers of speculation.

 

Carson was clearly the least educated person in the room on the subject matter. My acquaintance's boss had been sought out by Carson's staff to select this panel, and the boss had said that the objective was to educate Carson's team. As an example, at one point three members of the team were describing state policies and challenges dealing with the mentally ill in public housing. Their case examples focused on the severely depressed and bipolar individuals, especially as heads of households with children. They thought they were making good progress in their description of the situations, the challenges, and the procedures that were put in place for assessment, treatment, and protection of the families -- while Carson appeared to be listening thoughtfully. About twenty minutes in to this panel discussion/presentation Carson suddenly interrupted to blurt out, "Let me get this straight; we put
crazy people
in public housing?" My acquaintance was beside himself when he told me this story. He was one of the three participating in that portion of the discussion, and he was amazed at how thoroughly Dr. Carson missed so many points. For an esteemed medical professional to think of depressed and bipolar individuals or any men or women with diagnosed mental illness as "crazy people" was startling, as was the complete lack of respect for the professions of everyone who had flown to Washington to provide insight for his department. How Carson got the idea that state and private mental health agents "put" patients in public housing was equally clueless.

 

My friend also observed that, in the presence of experienced professionals, Carson had no problem making up his own versions of what the real national mental health challenges might be for those afflicted and in poverty, along with his solutions. He'd hear a statement from a career administrative professional or PhD, and he'd "correct" that person, again using his powers of speculation. One of his common themes was that people needed to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps, which would lead to a reference to his own accomplishments. My friend said that he nearly had a stroke every time Carson suggested that people could "think their way past" or "reason their way through" bipolar struggles, and he would compare it to the anxiety he faced as a neurosurgeon with difficult cases. Often Carson seized on a point and would ramble on mumbling his own ideas for 10-20 minutes at a time, contradicting himself several times. When he'd finish he would lean back further in his chair and smile as though he had taught the room something profound, blissfully unaware of how foolish he sounded when he used his imagination as a substitute for decades of combined experience and education, and unaware that he had enraged the 2-4 people who could hear him, and that most of the room had no idea what he had said and were politely nodding as they had been doing for hours. Carson would forego breaks because he felt that they were "onto something good."

 

Most of the panel participants wanted to head straight to a bar or to their hotel rooms to call spouses or friends to vent, after spending most of the day in a table discussion dominated by a man without the basic social and communication skills to even be heard. Imagine spending five or six hours three chairs down from a man who mumbles and all the while believes he's leading a discussion. My acquaintance's boss was livid for the rest of the trip; she was amazed that she had been asked to organize such a foolish experience. When she developed the agenda she had been told that they'd be meeting with qualified HUD staff members who had an interest in specific topics and/or directives to address said topics. There was not one person qualified to hear what the panel had to present. Anyone they met was a generalist, or someone with no experience with housing, health, or mental health. My friend has worked in or with state and federal government for almost 40 years. He said he's never seen anything before that has reeked so thoroughly of such incompetence and disfunction. He also found it remarkable that it appears so likely that folks have been forced to tolerate or enable Carson's functionally useless mumbling communication style for most of his career.

 

As the group met over dinner for the last two nights of the trip the conversation among mental health professionals often drifted to a deep dive into the characteristics of narcissism.

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This news shouldn't upset anyone. This isn't even a drop in the government bucket o' crazy expenditures. If we can write off a ferret as a therapy pet for tax purposes, there is no end to the madness that is the way our system "works".

 

It's not even a drop in the bucket but it's symbol of hypocrisy our national sin in action.

 

Folks who criticized Air Pelosi got caught flying private jets from DC to Philly, etc.

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

Ignore list: WilliamM

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It's not even a drop in the bucket but it's symbol of hypocrisy our national sin in action.

 

Folks who criticized Air Pelosi got caught flying private jets from DC to Philly, etc.

 

And all that constant chanting of "drain the swamp" - what exactly did it all mean?

 

Funny how the White House itself smells like a swamp these days...time to drain, repeal, and replace, lather, rince (but not reince), and repeat.

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And all that constant chanting of "drain the swamp" - what exactly did it all mean?

 

Funny how the White House itself smells like a swamp these days...time to drain, repeal, and replace, lather, rince (but not reince), and repeat.

 

Ah can assure you that the WHPO dont smell lahk no swamp!

“Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

 

-The Marx Brothers

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I know someone who was part of a local panel asked to come to Washington to speak with HUD about mental health treatment practices, management of third-party facilities, and coordination with public housing. The panel was not expecting this, but almost an entire day was spent in a meeting with Dr. Carson. This panel member has made a career of developing policy and procedures for oversight and management of mental health care and facilities, and for coordination with the state. He had the following feedback:

 

Hours of the meeting were wasted because Carson is ridiculously soft-spoken. At the head of a conference table for twelve people, in a small room with decent acoustics, Carson would speak in that heavenly whisper, reclined in his chair slowly gesturing with a confident smile. The people seated to his immediate left and right could barely hear him. Two down it was hit or miss, and beyond that it was a lost cause. Two of his staff members were present, and would occasionally remind Dr. Carson to speak a bit louder. He'd laugh as if it were some sort of pet peeve or in-joke with the staff, then he would enunciate so that half of the room could hear him -- for one or two minutes. This went on for five or six hours. Occasionally someone would ask Carson to repeat something, but he rarely raised his voice long enough to broadcast his entire point. About two hours in the panel and Carson's staff members gave up on prodding Carson to speak up. My acquaintance was two down from Carson. He reported that most of the discussion took place between Carson and the four people closest to him. In the beginning they'd try to repeat Carson's questions or points to bring in other panel members, especially if one of the more distant attendees was the subject matter expert. It grew frustrating to do so. In addition, while one of the closer panel members at the table was repeating a point to engage another member further down the table Carson would lean back and continue speaking toward the ceiling. Eventually, when people didn't hear his questions Carson would answer for himself using his powers of speculation.

 

Carson was clearly the least educated person in the room on the subject matter. My acquaintance's boss had been sought out by Carson's staff to select this panel, and the boss had said that the objective was to educate Carson's team. As an example, at one point three members of the team were describing state policies and challenges dealing with the mentally ill in public housing. Their case examples focused on the severely depressed and bipolar individuals, especially as heads of households with children. They thought they were making good progress in their description of the situations, the challenges, and the procedures that were put in place for assessment, treatment, and protection of the families -- while Carson appeared to be listening thoughtfully. About twenty minutes in to this panel discussion/presentation Carson suddenly interrupted to blurt out, "Let me get this straight; we put
crazy people
in public housing?" My acquaintance was beside himself when he told me this story. He was one of the three participating in that portion of the discussion, and he was amazed at how thoroughly Dr. Carson missed so many points. For an esteemed medical professional to think of depressed and bipolar individuals or any men or women with diagnosed mental illness as "crazy people" was startling, as was the complete lack of respect for the professions of everyone who had flown to Washington to provide insight for his department. How Carson got the idea that state and private mental health agents "put" patients in public housing was equally clueless.

 

My friend also observed that, in the presence of experienced professionals, Carson had no problem making up his own versions of what the real national mental health challenges might be for those afflicted and in poverty, along with his solutions. He'd hear a statement from a career administrative professional or PhD, and he'd "correct" that person, again using his powers of speculation. One of his common themes was that people needed to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps, which would lead to a reference to his own accomplishments. My friend said that he nearly had a stroke every time Carson suggested that people could "think their way past" or "reason their way through" bipolar struggles, and he would compare it to the anxiety he faced as a neurosurgeon with difficult cases. Often Carson seized on a point and would ramble on mumbling his own ideas for 10-20 minutes at a time, contradicting himself several times. When he'd finish he would lean back further in his chair and smile as though he had taught the room something profound, blissfully unaware of how foolish he sounded when he used his imagination as a substitute for decades of combined experience and education, and unaware that he had enraged the 2-4 people who could hear him, and that most of the room had no idea what he had said and were politely nodding as they had been doing for hours. Carson would forego breaks because he felt that they were "onto something good."

 

Most of the panel participants wanted to head straight to a bar or to their hotel rooms to call spouses or friends to vent, after spending most of the day in a table discussion dominated by a man without the basic social and communication skills to even be heard. Imagine spending five or six hours three chairs down from a man who mumbles and all the while believes he's leading a discussion. My acquaintance's boss was livid for the rest of the trip; she was amazed that she had been asked to organize such a foolish experience. When she developed the agenda she had been told that they'd be meeting with qualified HUD staff members who had an interest in specific topics and/or directives to address said topics. There was not one person qualified to hear what the panel had to present. Anyone they met was a generalist, or someone with no experience with housing, health, or mental health. My friend has worked in or with state and federal government for almost 40 years. He said he's never seen anything before that has reeked so thoroughly of such incompetence and disfunction. He also found it remarkable that it appears so likely that folks have been forced to tolerate or enable Carson's functionally useless mumbling communication style for most of his career.

 

As the group met over dinner for the last two nights of the trip the conversation among mental health professionals often drifted to a deep dive into the characteristics of narcissism.

 

Sounds like he has a lot of issues... one of them the denial of the way he was helped by big government.

 

We Americans talk Jeffersonian, live Hamiltonian.

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

Ignore list: WilliamM

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Sounds like he has a lot of issues... one of them the denial of the way he was helped by big government.

 

We Americans talk Jeffersonian, live Hamiltonian.

 

Sorry for the long post. I deleted an entire paragraph dedicated to how he decimated the agenda by frequently going way off topic, jumping back to agenda items that he had disrupted and interrupted hours earlier, and jumping ahead to items listed later on the agenda -- because he was reading the page while people were speaking and would jump in suddenly with, "oh, this looks interesting!"

 

For me the big take-aways were:

  • Carson dumbing down a presentation of serious, complex health and social issues to - "...we put crazy people in public housing?"
  • Suggesting that people with bipolar illnesses can overcome their affliction through sheer force of will, and comparing their struggles to the challenges of an accomplished neurosurgeon.
  • Presiding over meetings while being thoroughly incapable of communicating within or to a small group, let alone leading that group.

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