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Anyone’s Skin React to Massage Cream?


Leão
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I’ve had dozens of massages from legit full-service spas, mostly in DC. For the first time, last week my skin reacted to the massage cream. Small welts, some red and some with no color; on my lower legs and back of arms ... EXACTLY where the therapist didn’t wipe after with a warm towel. They don’t itch but they aren’t going away after a few days, even with OTC hydrocortisone cream and antihistamines. I’ve scheduled an appointment with an allergist, but wondering if the collective wisdom has had this experience.

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Not with massage cream but with an escort and lube (Gun Oil.) I've used Gun Oil many time but JEEZ - my whole ass, inside and outside got bright red, painful as Hell, and swollen in a 2 inch border around my anus starting about 2 hours after the meet.. i could barely walk or sit for days and had to use silvadene cream (for burns) and Lidocaine gel along with the hydrocortisone (Rx 2.5%). Took 3 weeks!

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I’ve had dozens of massages from legit full-service spas, mostly in DC. For the first time, last week my skin reacted to the massage cream. Small welts, some red and some with no color; on my lower legs and back of arms ... EXACTLY where the therapist didn’t wipe after with a warm towel. They don’t itch but they aren’t going away after a few days, even with OTC hydrocortisone cream and antihistamines. I’ve scheduled an appointment with an allergist, but wondering if the collective wisdom has had this experience.

I have had the same reaction you describe on legs and chest, I went to a dermatologist who said it was contact dermatitis most likely brought on by an allergy to the massage cream which was probably coconut or nut based. Its best to stick to mineral oil, olive oil or hypoallergenic stuff like biotone.

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I know what you mean - I am pretty lucky - but we use non toxic products in our home for everything, and have been known to take my own massage oil with me to an apointment. if you want to explore this further with me - please PM me - I can point you in the right directions for products.

Many mainstream products contain ingredients that some people are allergic to, from skin to bloodstream in 20 seconds, and most topical products do not come under FDA regulation (not that approval by the FDA means anything when it comes to allergic reactions)

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Update ... for what it's worth: contact dermatitis. No big whoop; just unsightly and temporary. Allergist researched BioTone and there are multiple types, many with oil, which is what she suspects triggered it. I called the spa and they could only tell me "Biotone", which isn't really helpful in avoiding future cases. For those like me who think that the right combo of OTC topicals or antihistimines will take care of it: not going to work. Thanks again for the feedback.

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Yeah, not all Biotone products are hypoallergenic. So I'd ask them what the product name on the bottle is. And the contact dermatitis could come from something you were fine with before. I had a coworker that developed it on her arms from the lotion that we were required to use at the spa. She was fine there for over a year, then became sensitive to it. She had to make sure she washed her arms thoroughly after each massage.

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Yeah, not all Biotone products are hypoallergenic. So I'd ask them what the product name on the bottle is. And the contact dermatitis could come from something you were fine with before. I had a coworker that developed it on her arms from the lotion that we were required to use at the spa. She was fine there for over a year, then became sensitive to it. She had to make sure she washed her arms thoroughly after each massage.

Thx. That’s what’s frustrating; reacting to something I was fine with before. I’ll ask for the hypoallergenic cream from now on. In your experience, do the therapist or client notice any difference between the hypoallergenic and non-hypoallergenic creams?

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super sensitive skin here and some professional massage creams, gels and oils have left me with a burning rash or even erupted like boils on over massaged areas. I have success with natural oils, but sometimes I feel they take for ever to wash off. Then I tried Shea Nut Oil and that seems to work the best and easily washes off in the shower. (and no cramps #muscleboyinsd it is runs down in your butt - haha) Happy Massaging Boys! -xx

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Thx. That’s what’s frustrating; reacting to something I was fine with before. I’ll ask for the hypoallergenic cream from now on. In your experience, do the therapist or client notice any difference between the hypoallergenic and non-hypoallergenic creams?

usually it's a matter of glide, normally you notice a difference when you switch from and oil to cream, but that's usually as a therapist, on the table they both may feel the same.

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super sensitive skin here and some professional massage creams, gels and oils have left me with a burning rash or even erupted like boils on over massaged areas. I have success with natural oils, but sometimes I feel they take for ever to wash off. Then I tried Shea Nut Oil and that seems to work the best and easily washes off in the shower. (and no cramps #muscleboyinsd it is runs down in your butt - haha) Happy Massaging Boys! -xx

 

definitely gonna bring a bottle of Shea nut oil to my next massage ;)

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