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A Cuisine Qustion


gallahadesquire
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I just got home from another fabulous meal at The Castle restaurant in Leicester, MA.

 

My question is:

How many of you would go to a restaurant that serves French cuisine that's from ca. 1950?

Sweetbreads, escargot, onion soup ... we had Red Deer at 31 each, in a glace reduction and blueberry sauce.

 

Ceasar salad made at the table.

 

A 1988 Grand Escheseaux by Maison Drouhin for $295 (it's my housemate's birthday) that retails for quite a bit more. Many similar wines for equally discounted wines.

 

Who would go?

Do not try to the patience of Dragons, for you are Crunchy and good with Ketchup.

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Zero chance that I would eat that particular meal. I’ve tried escargot several times and am not a fan. The thought of sweetbreads sickens me. Onion soup is nice though. :)

 

I’ve been to several “French inspired” restaurants that I enjoyed, but anytime I’ve gone to an old style French restaurant, I found them stuffy and pretentious.

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I just got home from another fabulous meal at The Castle restaurant in Leicester, MA.

 

My question is:

How many of you would go to a restaurant that serves French cuisine that's from ca. 1950?

Sweetbreads, escargot, onion soup ... we had Red Deer at 31 each, in a glace reduction and blueberry sauce.

 

Ceasar salad made at the table.

 

A 1988 Grand Escheseaux by Maison Drouhin for $295 (it's my housemate's birthday) that retails for quite a bit more. Many similar wines for equally discounted wines.

 

Who would go?

Me +1000

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I just got home from another fabulous meal at The Castle restaurant in Leicester, MA.

 

My question is:

How many of you would go to a restaurant that serves French cuisine that's from ca. 1950?

Sweetbreads, escargot, onion soup ... we had Red Deer at 31 each, in a glace reduction and blueberry sauce.

 

Ceasar salad made at the table.

 

A 1988 Grand Escheseaux by Maison Drouhin for $295 (it's my housemate's birthday) that retails for quite a bit more. Many similar wines for equally discounted wines.

 

Who would go?

I have a personal rule.... if Sweetbreads are available, I order them. Love escargot. Good onion soup.

 

I dont know what red deer is. Venison?

 

Dont recognize the wine.... is it a bordeaux?

 

I think the last time I had salad made tableside was La Grenouille... decades ago. Or was that Tartare?

 

I wonder what conclusions will be drawn by 22nd Century anthropologists and social scientists who study early 21st Century social media.

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This place, after > 50 years, is probably on its last legs. On a SATURDAY night, there were 4 tables (out of > 20) occupied at 7:00, and no one was there after 9:30.

 

Any one for Steak Diane or Steak au Poivre, done at tableside?

Or a Graham '83 vintage port of $19?

 

MENU: http://www.castlerestaurant.com/camelotmenu/

[url=http://www.castlerestaurant.com/camelotmenu/][/url]

They don't publish their wine list, but it is CHEAP CHEAP CHEAP and we're talkin' Premier Cru (Haut Brion comes to mind).

Do not try to the patience of Dragons, for you are Crunchy and good with Ketchup.

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Zero chance that I would eat that particular meal. I’ve tried escargot several times and am not a fan. The thought of sweetbreads sickens me. Onion soup is nice though. :)

 

I’ve been to several “French inspired” restaurants that I enjoyed, but anytime I’ve gone to an old style French restaurant, I found them stuffy and pretentious.

 

 

I’m with Mikey-I’d go for the onion soup minus the melted cheese on top although I love the crouton. When it comes to cheese, I like mostly pizza and cheesecake.

 

Gman

Gman

 

In brightest day, in blackest night, No evil shall escape my sight. Let those who worship evil's might, Beware my power, The Great Gazoo is always right!!!!

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I just got home from another fabulous meal at The Castle restaurant in Leicester, MA.

 

My question is:

How many of you would go to a restaurant that serves French cuisine that's from ca. 1950?

Sweetbreads, escargot, onion soup ... we had Red Deer at 31 each, in a glace reduction and blueberry sauce.

 

Ceasar salad made at the table.

 

A 1988 Grand Escheseaux by Maison Drouhin for $295 (it's my housemate's birthday) that retails for quite a bit more. Many similar wines for equally discounted wines.

 

Who would go?

 

My opinion? Much of the world has moved on from ca. 1950...No? Might be time to reinvent the place, a fresh coat of paint and a more modern menu. I just got back from dinner at a restaurant that had been around for 30 + years. A few years back it went belly up. No one could understand why. Back in it's hey day, it wasn't fancy, but it was legendary among the locals. Two years to find new owners, and over a year in renovations, including a new menu...Tonight without reservations, the wait was an hour and half to get in....Sometimes a little nip and tuck is just what the doctor ordered.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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The menu looks wonderful! Absolutely yes.

 

I enjoy some of the traditional dishes -- Escargot/Onion Soup/Venison/The Quail all look Good --- And it looks as if they have modernized both menus. All of the Seafood Dishes sound lovely -=-

 

I would refer to the Menu in the Camelot Room as Fine Dining with Traditional French Highlights == and a Strong Local Seafood Infusion

 

and the Crusader Room Menu as Nice Diner Menu-- It has no focus or direction -- Onion Rings/Asian Ribs/Chicken Parm?????

All Good

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My question is:

How many of you would go to a restaurant that serves French cuisine that's from ca. 1950?

Sweetbreads, escargot, onion soup ... we had Red Deer at 31 each, in a glace reduction and blueberry sauce.

 

Ceasar salad made at the table.

 

Love sweetbreads, escargot, and onion soup. Have never had the deer, but would be willing to try it.

 

Love classic French. Getting tougher to find these days.

Can you be more specific? :p

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Love classic French. Getting tougher to find these days.

Yeah, everything is fusion this & tapas that nowadays. As much as I love my pintxos (the Basque spelling), I absolutely despise this tapas craze. Tapas today are what everybody used to call appetizers. If you want to order two or three, go ahead, nobody's stopping you.

 

As for the un-trendiness of French cuisine, it bums me out to see classic French cuisine fading from the gastronomic landscape. I simply love classic, country French cuisine. All this trendier-than-thou BS is just so damn annoying.

My ignore list:  marylander1940, MiamiLooker, stevenkesslar

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the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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One of the chapters in "Gulp", by Mary Roach (a whimsical look at the science behind all things involving food & digestion) she talked about the waning popularity of organ meats, and how good they were, nutritionally. I've never had sweetbreads, I'm not exactly sure what organ they are, and I'm honestly not eager to try them.

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One of the chapters in "Gulp", by Mary Roach (a whimsical look at the science behind all things involving food & digestion) she talked about the waning popularity of organ meats, and how good they were, nutritionally. I've never had sweetbreads, I'm not exactly sure what organ they are, and I'm honestly not eager to try them.

 

 

Thymus glands. If you are one who needs to limit dietary cholesterol, sweetbreads are not a good choice. Brains are about the only food source higher in cholesterol content than sweetbreads.

Edited by Rudynate
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I just got home from another fabulous meal at The Castle restaurant in Leicester, MA.

 

My question is:

How many of you would go to a restaurant that serves French cuisine that's from ca. 1950?

Sweetbreads, escargot, onion soup ... we had Red Deer at 31 each, in a glace reduction and blueberry sauce.

 

Ceasar salad made at the table.

 

A 1988 Grand Escheseaux by Maison Drouhin for $295 (it's my housemate's birthday) that retails for quite a bit more. Many similar wines for equally discounted wines.

 

Who would go?

I’d have the wine but no thanks to the old fashioned food.

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