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New Study Finds A Step Backwards for Us Since Election


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Constant rhetoric against the LGBTQ community by the current administration has taken a toll on forward progress in the community of acceptance. It's only a four year study, but the pendulum swing is pronounced. We have three more years of this to endure! Hopefully it won't be Seven!

 

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/americans-less-comfortable-lgbt-people-now-172719953.html

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Yep...that's why I'm not necessarily in favor of a Trump impeachment. As wonderful as it would feel to have that accomplished, I don't think we would gain in the long run.

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How much of this change is simply responders being somewhat more honest, rather than giving the answers they believed were respectable before?

Much of it I suspect. During the marriage vote here many people, including the ACT Chief Minister, received homophobic abuse in a way they hadn't for years. Such abusers are unlikely to have changed their views, just changed their comfort level in expressing them.

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I also think that people may be expressing anti-LGBT answers both because they were stifling them before and because now that they see the President thinks it is fine they find nothing wrong with it. I think it is similar to anti-Muslim rhetoric. Trump has let loose so Muslim haters think it is fine (maybe even admirable) to do so.

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  • It is not just "the gays."

 

Opinions

Republicans redefine morality as whatever Trump does

 

dana-milbank.jpg&w=80&h=80&t=20170517a

By Dana Milbank Opinion writer January 26 at 6:35 PM Washington Post

 

Someday, likely three years from now, perhaps sooner, perhaps — gulp — later, President Trump will depart the stage.

 

But what will be left of us?

 

New evidence suggests that the damage he is doing to the culture is bigger than the man. A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday found that two-thirds of Americans say Trump is not a good role model for children. Every component of society feels that way — men and women, old and young, black and white, highly educated or not — except for one: Republicans. By 72 to 22 percent, they say Trump is a good role model.

 

 

In marked contrast to the rest of the country, Republicans also say that Trump shares their values (82 percent) and that — get this — he “provides the United States with moral leadership” (80 percent).

 

And what moral leadership this role model has been providing!

 

It might be good Trump said "shithole." We're talking about racism. Opinion writers Molly Roberts, Christine Emba, Alexandra Petri and Steve Stromberg discuss. (The Washington Post)

 

Soon after the release of this poll, we learned that Trump, in an effort to halt the Russia probe, planned to fire special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, backing off only because his own White House counsel threatened to resign. So Trump obviously didn’t speak the truth when he said that he had never contemplated such a firing. And, at this writing, he is in Switzerland, responding by renewing his denunciations of the “fake news” media — an attack on the free press now emulated by despots the world over.In fairness, we learned of the proposed Mueller firing after the poll was conducted, so let’s see what else might have led 72 percent of Republicans to conclude Trump is a good role model:

 

His lawyer arranged to make payment to a porn star, Stormy Daniels, a month before the election for her silence about an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, according to the Wall Street Journal.

 

He used a vulgar word to describe African countries during a racist rant to lawmakers at the White House.

 

He was mounting a campaign to discredit the “corrupt” FBI, the Justice Department and the special prosecutor, just as he previously sought to disqualify courts and judges.

 

He backed a credibly accused child molester for the Senate from Alabama.

 

And so on.

 

 

Yet so strong is the pull of tribalism that we’ve reached a point where partisanship outweighs morality. Republicans aren’t approving of Trumpdespite his behavior; in calling him a role model, they’re approving his behavior.

 

No doubt some of those Republicans now condoning Trump’s behavior will give the standard rebuttal: What about the Clintons? Well, Quinnipiac didn’t poll nationally during the Clinton presidency, but Gallup, during President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial in January 1999, asked a similar question. The number of Republicans back then saying Clinton did not provide good moral leadership, 91 percent, was similar to the 96 percent of Democrats who say Trump does not provide moral leadership today. The difference: Democrats disapproved of Clinton’s morality by 2 to 1 (65 to 33 percent), even as they overwhelmingly approved of his job performance. Only 16 percent of Republicans today say Trump does not provide moral leadership.

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Where is BOZO T CLOWN who told us many times Trump was on our side?

 

Opinion | Contributing Op-Ed Writer

Is America Growing Less Tolerant on L.G.B.T.Q. Rights?

BOYLAN_NEW-thumbLarge-v3.jpg

Jennifer Finney Boylan JAN. 29, 2018

 

merlin_133078676_ade3da63-ff97-44f7-88b2-4cbccc70b1ac-master768.jpg

Donald Trump at a campaign rally in October 2016 in Colorado. Credit Evan Vucci/Associated Press

When my sister came out, there was an accordion trio on hand to perform the music of Sly and the Family Stone. Debutantes in white dresses and boys with matching cummberbunds and bowties drank from the waters of a gurgling champagne fountain. The entire affair, staged in my parents’ old house in Devon, Pa., was an anachronism, to be sure — but as wingdings go, it was tons of fun. It was 1975.

 

When I came out, in 2002, there wasn’t any party. There were tense meetings with the affirmative action/equal opportunity officer at my place of work; there was a carefully worded statement sent to my colleagues explaining exactly what “transgender” was; there was a series of conversations with my friends, and my mother, and the people whom I loved best, many of whom — in spite of their brave pledges to stand by me — ended those conversations in tears.

 

That was then.

 

People who “come out” at debutante parties have been off my radar for a long time now, although apparently they’re still going strong in some quarters. As for L.G.B.T.Q. people, “coming out” has gotten safer in fits and starts, not only in the wake of the Obergefell decision but also in other ways: L.G.B.T.Q. people are now visible in a way that was inconceivable half a generation ago. Most of the people that I thought I had lost after my 2002 unveiling have, miraculously, been returned to me, the intervening years having brought not only forgiveness but also understanding. Since my coming out, our family has thrived, and in the wake of that progress, I have believed that just as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. predicted, the arc of the moral universe does indeed bend toward justice.

 

Until now.

 

Last week, GLAAD — the media advocacy group for L.G.B.T.Q. people (of which I was a national co-chairwoman from 2013 to 2017) — released the results of its latest “Accelerating Acceptance” survey at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. While the biggest headlines from the forum focused on the fact that the president of the United States managed to get through an event on the world stage without

or calling anyone’s country an outhouse, the results of the poll, conducted by Harris, deserve attention as well. They are shocking.

 

For the first time since the poll began, support for L.G.B.T.Q. people has dropped, in all seven areas that the survey measured. They include “having an L.G.B.T. person at my place of worship” (24 percent of Americans are “very” or “somewhat” uncomfortable), seeing a same-sex couple holding hands (31 percent are uncomfortable) and “learning my child has an L.G.B.T. teacher at school” (37 percent are uncomfortable).

 

The increase in these numbers over years previous is not dramatic — 3 percent in some instances, two in others. What’s significant is not the margin of increase but the fact that the numbers are going up instead of down. In the life of this poll, that has never happened before.

 

The poll, now in its fourth year, shows that in many areas, the statistics measuring uncomfortability with L.G.B.T.Q. people are right back where they were in 2014, as if all the progress made during the second Obama administration never happened. And in the past year, the number of L.G.B.T.Q. people reporting discrimination on the basis of their sexuality or gender identity has jumped 11 percent — to 55 percent in 2017 from 44 percent in 2016.

 

 

Every weekday, get thought-provoking commentary from Op-Ed columnists, the Times editorial board and contributing writers from around the world.

 

The reason for the change is not hard to discern. Since Day 1, Donald Trump and his administration have sent out the signal that division and prejudice are now the coins of the realm. Week by week, tweet by tweet, Mr. Trump has normalized all of our worst impulses — and the routine expression of homophobia and transphobia not least.

 

The list of disasters for the community in the past year is not short: Mr. Trump’s administration sided with the right to discriminate against L.G.B.T.Q. Americans in the Masterpiece Cake case before the Supreme Court; he declared a new policy removing L.G.B.T.Q. people from the 2020 census; he failed to even mention gay people on World AIDS Day; and he attempted (although so far has failed) to ban trans people from the military. And of course, he made Mike Pence his vice president, a man who, as a congressional candidate, html">endorsed conversion therapy and who, as governor of Indiana, defunded H.I.V./AIDs testing and prevention — an action that may well have led to a record outbreak of the disease in that state.

 

All of this comes in spite of Mr. Trump’s baloney during the campaign about what a great supporter he’d be of our community. “I will fight for you while Hillary brings in more people that will threaten your freedoms and beliefs,” he said. At one event he was even photographed holding a rainbow flag, although many observers noted that he was, symbolically enough, holding it upside down.

 

But the worst part of the past year — as the Harris Poll makes clear — may be less about Mr. Trump’s specific deeds, as bad as those are. The biggest damage may be the permission he has given for those with hate in their hearts to express it.

 

During my own coming out, back in 2002, I had feared the worst. And yet most of the things I dreaded did not, in fact, come to pass. I didn’t lose my job; I didn’t lose my family. But then, as a white person, the baked-in protection of privilege has shielded me from much of the violence and fear that is rife in my community.

Twenty-sevenmain story trans women were murdered in 2017, most of them of color.

 

When I think of my sister’s coming out, I also remember my Republican father, who had friends both gay and straight, even then. The night of that party, after he and I mixed up the punch, he looked on with amusement as my friends cavorted on the dance floor. The accordion trio was singing: “Everybody is a star; I can feel it when you shine on me. I love you for who you are, not the one you feel you need to be.”

 

My father has been gone for a long time now, but I carry him in my heart. I can still hear his voice, as he considered the words of that song. “Wouldn’t it be nice,” he said to me, wistfully, “if that were true.”

 

It would.

 

New York Times

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Dana Milbank sounds like the typical leftist, poisoned by hatred for Trump, Republicans, Christians, and conservatives. I can't even count how many times I rolled my eyes while reading his op-ed. He does bring up an interesting point, however, that only 16% of Republicans say that Trump does not provide moral leadership. I have no idea if this is true or not, first because I doubt anything that comes out of Milbank's mouth and second because you can cut numbers and word poll questions to "prove" pretty much anything you want.

 

Nonetheless, he does highlight the paradox that millions of Christians do support Donald Trump. I think conservative talk show host Steve Deace summed it up best:

 

Mitt Romney, man of dignity and Mr. Family, instructed his DHS as governor to force Catholic charities to take part in homosexual adoptions, wouldn't eat a Chick-fil-a sandwich when it might've won him a presidency, and then lobbied the state of Arizona not to defend religious freedom a few years ago.

 

Donald Trump, man of decadence and hush money to porn stars, has today directed a division of the federal government to actively protect religious freedom and rights of conscience. And also used his presidency two years in a row now to provide greater exposure to the March for Life, which the media had been willfully ignoring for years.

 

Make of that what you will. But facts are facts.

 

Unfortunately, Christians in America have been left in the lurch by the politicians who glad-hand for their vote only to betray them later. Christians might hate how Donald Trump has lived his life but acknowledge that Trump has defended them more staunchly than even Christianity-on-his-sleeve George W. Bush.

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As bad as the climate may appear for gays these days, things were far worse during the christian conservative Bush years... Never forget that fact!

 

Trump is actually not too bad when it comes to gay issues. He's mostly just pandering to the chirstian right-wing nuts for votes now, he knows he can't win w/o them, that's why he picked Pence in the first place.

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As bad as the climate may appear for gays these days, things were far worse during the christian conservative Bush years... Never forget that fact!

Trump is actually not too bad when it comes to gay issues. He's mostly just pandering to the chirstian right-wing nuts for votes now, he knows he can't win w/o them, that's why he picked Pence in the first place.

 

We'll see what tune you are singing when the Supreme Court comes out with its rulings about being able to discriminate against gays in the private sector. He got Gorsuch on the Court so if Kennedy flips for some reasons (please Lord Jesus, no!) you are one step away from being refused service in restaurants or clothing stores, or who knows what. You already don't have a right to federal employment (certainly not Trump's fault but he ain't fighting to have legislation passed). A doctor once told me, "Comparative suffering is not helpful (e.g., I have epilepsy but at least I don't have cancer)." So the fact that Trump is not as bad allegedly as a horrible Bush is really all that comforting. Thanks for the attempt though.

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We'll see what tune you are singing when the Supreme Court comes out with its rulings about being able to discriminate against gays in the private sector. He got Gorsuch on the Court so if Kennedy flips for some reasons (please Lord Jesus, no!) you are one step away from being refused service in restaurants or clothing stores, or who knows what. You already don't have a right to federal employment (certainly not Trump's fault but he ain't fighting to have legislation passed). A doctor once told me, "Comparative suffering is not helpful (e.g., I have epilepsy but at least I don't have cancer)." So the fact that Trump is not as bad allegedly as a horrible Bush is really all that comforting. Thanks for the attempt though.

Hysteria like this is why I think of leftists as professional victims. "One step away from being refused service in restaurants or clothing stores"?? Spare me. Not one single photographer, venue owner, baker, or florist who has been sued ever denied a gay person service just for being gay. They just drew the line at servicing a gay wedding because of their religious stance against gay marriage.

 

Of all the Christian business owners who got sued for refusing to service a gay wedding, find me one, just one, who refused to serve a gay person just for being gay. Then I will gladly retract and apologize for my "professional victims" remark.

 

And while you're doing your research, try to find a single Muslim business owner who has been sued for refusing to service a gay wedding. These lawsuits that shut down Christian business owners don't happen just by chance. Gay activists seek out Christian businesses to see if they will service their wedding, and once they find one that refuses for religious reasons, they sic their gay activist lawyers (with experience and expertise in this specific lawsuit) on the Christian business. Oddly enough, this campaign to shut down all who disagree with gay marriage is limited to Christians. Not one lawsuit has ever targeted a Muslim business, even though plenty of Muslim businesses also draw the line at gay marriage:

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Got it. Leftists are professional victims, but Christians are real victims.

Your nasty sarcasm probably amuses you, but it's tiresome for the rest of us.

 

You called me on the carpet a while back over this Muslim issue, so I extend the same offer to you. Of all the Christian business owners who got sued, find one who refused service to a gay person just for being gay. Also, I'd really love it if you could find one single Muslim business owner who has been targeted by the Gay Social Justice Warriors. You actually floated the risible theory that perhaps Muslim business owners are in compliance with the law. Pfffffft, it took Steven Crowder all of one afternoon to find a number of Muslim-owned businesses that violated the law. Your theory was utter bullsh*t, then again, you knew that at the time.

 

Or perhaps you'd rather devote your time and energy to joining @TruthBTold in a group sob-in, where you leftist gays dream up all sorts of wild-eyed hysteria about gay oppression. Of course, neither one of you (or any of us) is systematically oppressed in this country. But that doesn't stop the two of you from weeping into your kerchiefs. Yeah, that's more up your alley.

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Oh, poor daisy, you are now also victim of my sarcasm! And you say "we"!!! So I guess you are the queen of he victims of my sarcasm.

God save the Christian Queen!

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I'm not a Christian. I'm not religious in any way. I am a (very) lapsed Catholic. I stopped going to mass, even on Christmas, a decade+ ago. I did grow up super-Catholic: 13 years of Catholic schooling, years as an altar boy, trips to Rome during Holy Week, the whole nine yards. But I am now completely un-practicing. While I feel a strong kinship with practicing Catholics, I've never felt particularly comfortable with evangelical Christians (all business owners who got sued are evangelicals). I won't go into the specifics why, that's for a different thread, but I have a tough time relating to them.

 

Yeah, I didn't think you had an response for either one of the challenges I posed. @TruthBTold 's scenario of gays being shut out of businesses across the land is nothing but wild-eyed hysteria, not to mention unchecked self-indulgence. Meanwhile, the attitudes of practicing Muslims are far more homophobic and virulently anti-gay, yet Leftist Groupthink Headquarters demands that Muslims get a free pass, and Groupthink's obedient drones paradoxically drop all interest in gay social justice.

 

I'm sure you have plenty more sarcasm to spew and cute little GIFs to post (I do like your GIFs, by the way). God knows it's a bottomless well. But if you ever come up with even a single Christian business owner who discriminated against gays just for being gay or a single Muslim business owner who got sued, please make that contribution to this board.

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I'm not a Christian. I'm not religious in any way. I am a (very) lapsed Catholic. I stopped going to mass, even on Christmas, a decade+ ago. I did grow up super-Catholic: 13 years of Catholic schooling, years as an altar boy, trips to Rome during Holy Week, the whole nine yards. But I am now completely un-practicing. While I feel a strong kinship with practicing Catholics, I've never felt particularly comfortable with evangelical Christians (all business owners who got sued are evangelicals). I won't go into the specifics why, that's for a different thread, but I have a tough time relating to them.

 

Yeah, I didn't think you had an response for either one of the challenges I posed. @TruthBTold 's scenario of gays being shut out of businesses across the land is nothing but wild-eyed hysteria, not to mention unchecked self-indulgence. Meanwhile, the attitudes of practicing Muslims are far more homophobic and virulently anti-gay, yet Leftist Groupthink Headquarters demands that Muslims get a free pass, and Groupthink's obedient drones paradoxically drop all interest in gay social justice.

 

I'm sure you have plenty more sarcasm to spew and cute little GIFs to post (I do like your GIFs, by the way). God knows it's a bottomless well. But if you ever come up with even a single Christian business owner who discriminated against gays just for being gay or a single Muslim business owner who got sued, please make that contribution to this board.

What do you mean by "just for being gay"? Not following you. Sorry.

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Constant rhetoric against the LGBTQ community by the current administration has taken a toll on forward progress in the community of acceptance. It's only a four year study, but the pendulum swing is pronounced. We have three more years of this to endure! Hopefully it won't be Seven!

 

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/americans-less-comfortable-lgbt-people-now-172719953.html

 

Mike Pence as President might worse.

Liberal, born and raised in Maryland, proud member of pink pistols!

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What do you mean by "just for being gay"? Not following you. Sorry.

Every single one of the Christian business owners who got sued were happy to serve gay customers. One of the bakers who lost her business thought of her customer (the one who ended up suing her) as a friend. Whenever he came in, she greeted him with a big smile, served him a cup of coffee and a slice of pie, and sat down with him for a chat. She happily baked cakes for him when he needed for other occasions, like birthday parties. In fact, every single Christian business owner was happy to serve all their gay customers' wants and needs, except one. They drew the line at gay weddings because they believe in traditional marriage between one man and one woman.

 

That's why I accuse @TruthBTold and @latbear4blk of wild-eyed hysteria. TruthBTold predicts a dark future where gays are shut out of businesses all over the land. Well, that never happened, not even once, with these Christian business owners, so why the hell does he see homosexual doom in the future?? They dream up oppression where none exists. People who conjure up delusions of oppression are professional victims.

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