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The Shithole Shutdown looms...


Oaktown
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Who controls the house?

 

Republicans ✔

 

The Senate?

 

Republicans ✔

 

The White House?

 

Republicans ✔

 

Who will get blamed if the government shuts down???

 

Republicans ✔

Whoever would have guessed that a TV reality star with no government experience, 6 bankruptcies, 5 children from 3 different marriages, 11 charges of sexual assault, 4,000+ lawsuits would turn out this bad?

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Who controls the house?

 

Republicans ✔

 

The Senate?

 

Republicans ✔

 

The White House?

 

Republicans ✔

 

Who will get blamed if the government shuts down???

 

Republicans ✔

 

Which side is more skilled in creating phony issues in order to distract and shift blame?

“Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

 

-The Marx Brothers

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Let me ask you folks sumthin: Do ah get paid regularly if the liberal Democrats shut down the government?

Yes, but the donuts next to the coffee will not be there. The donut delivery man doesn't trust the government to get paid. Make a few pies and bring them in for the staff.

JANUARY 06, 2021 THE MOST VIOLENT DAY IN THE HISTORY OF THE US CAPITOL BUILDING, WASHINGTON DC.

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Yes, but the donuts next to the coffee will not be there. The donut delivery man doesn't trust the government to get paid. Make a few pies and bring them in for the staff.

 

Well ya know ahm anti-establishment and all, but ah am hip ta some of the ways of DC. So ah aint bakin no pies for staff; they gotta bake em for Shuck. Gotta throw your weight around sometimes.

“Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

 

-The Marx Brothers

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Who controls the house?

 

Republicans ✔

 

The Senate?

 

Republicans ✔

 

The White House?

 

Republicans ✔

 

Who will get blamed if the government shuts down???

 

Republicans ✔

 

The bill requires 60 Senate votes. Sorry, the Republicans do not “control” the Senate on votes that need more that 50%. Passing judges, yes. Reconciliation votes, yes. This vote, no.

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The bill requires 60 Senate votes. Sorry, the Republicans do not “control” the Senate on votes that need more that 50%. Passing judges, yes. Reconciliation votes, yes. This vote, no.

 

Theoretically yes, but it also depends on what percentage of Republicans vote no.

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New York Times

 

The White House 'sold' Kelly as someone who could teach Trump how to be president, not delve deeply into making policy decisions from the far right. Yet another loony general.

 

Opinion | Op-Ed Columnist

John Kelly, Deacon of Deportation

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Charles M. Blow JAN. 17, 2018

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White House Chief of Staff General John Kelly in the Oval Office last October. Credit Tom Brenner/The New York Times

People correctly direct their ire about Donald Trump’s hostile, racist, anti-immigrant policies at Trump himself because, after all, this starts at the top.

 

But there is someone else in the administration, behind the scenes and in the shadows, who deserves more scrutiny and more condemnation for this administration’s approach to immigration: Chief of Staff John Kelly.

 

Kelly is often referred to as the man who was brought to the West Wing to impose must-needed discipline on a chaotic White House. He was the access granter and mood regulator for Trump. He was the adult to Trump’s child. He was the former general who had honorably served his country, now brought in to save it.

 

In the most recent kerfuffle over Trump’s torpedoing of a bipartisan DACA deal, in which he made a racist attack against immigrants from African countries and Haiti, it became increasingly clear that Kelly was instrumental in influencing Trump to flip from a stance of openness and compromise back to a celestial alignment with immigration hard-liners.

 

As The Associated Press reported this week, after Trump requested a briefing on a bipartisan immigration deal sponsored by Senators Lindsey Graham, a Republican, and Dick Durbin, a Democrat:

 

“Chief of staff John Kelly phoned Trump from Capitol Hill to advise him against accepting the proposal, and the president summoned conservative Republican negotiators to help build a united front against the plan, which would have provided some border security funding as well as protection from deportation for immigrants brought to the country as children and now here illegally.”

 

 

Graham was not happy about the ambush or the reversal and pointed out who he believed to be the source of the problem, telling reporters, “I think somebody on his staff gave him really bad advice between 10 o’clock to 12 o’clock on Thursday.” Graham went on to say that Kelly is “a fine man, but he’s part of the staff.”

 

Actually, Kelly is following the Kelly-Trump immigration doctrine.

 

This was just the latest incident in Kelly’s revealing track record on immigration since Trump has been in office.

 

Kelly is no angel. He’s more like the devil’s handmaiden. As The Times’s Glenn Thrush reported in October, Kelly seems to be “moving from the role of quiet backstage manager to open partisan.”

 

His hostility toward immigration has been evident from the beginning of his time in the administration.

When Kelly was brought on as chief of staff in July, The Nation warned, “John Kelly’s promotion is a disaster for immigrants,” pointing out that in just six months as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, he turned it into “a deportation machine.”

 

The Nation went on:

 

“Indeed, in the last six months, Kelly has turned the DHS into one of the most productive arms of the Trump administration. Kelly managed to translate much of Trump’s brazen anti-immigrant campaign rhetoric into actual policy. And if the numbers are any indication, Kelly has certainly flourished. Arrests since Trump took office in February increased by 40 percent over the prior year. But perhaps more important than the numbers is Kelly’s impact on immigrant communities, where apprehension and fear now reign.”

 

While at the D.H.S., Kelly even considered separating immigrant parents from their accompanying children if they enter the country illegally. As The Times reported:

 

“Still, the prospect of breaking a sacred bond between parent and child has not been an easy decision. Mr. Kelly said early this year that he was considering the move, but after an uproar from immigrant advocates and some members of Congress, he said that families would be separated only in extreme circumstances, such as when the child was in danger because of the parent.”

 

One of Kelly’s primary targets has been the Temporary Protected Status program.

 

As The Times has reported: “The protection for Haitians was most recently extended in May, by John F. Kelly, the Homeland Security secretary at the time. He allowed only a six-month extension, a shorter one than is typical, saying that the Haitians ‘need to start thinking about returning.’”

 

The Times also reported that in November, Kelly “unsuccessfully tried to pressure the Homeland Security Department to end a program that allows hundreds of thousands of people from countries affected by natural disasters or violence to live in the United States without fear of being deported, according to people familiar with the discussions.”

 

Many of those countries have populations that are either black or brown. Those were the countries Trump vulgarly disparaged. So why are Trump and Kelly so dogged in their opposition to these particular programs?

 

I, along with many others, have pointed out Trump’s obvious racism, but Kelly’s relationship to race is also troubling.

 

In October, Kelly said that “Robert E. Lee was an honorable man” and that “the lack of an ability to compromise led to the Civil War,” displaying a staggering ignorance about the conflict and a racial insensitivity that marginalized the centrality of slavery to the war.

 

Furthermore, while at D.H.S., Kelly appointed the Rev. Jamie Johnson to lead the Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. It was later disclosed that in 2008 Johnson had said on a radio show that black people were anti-Semitic because they were envious of Jewish people. Johnson also said America’s black community “had turned America’s major cities into slums because of laziness, drug use and sexual promiscuity.”

 

I am no fan of John Kelly. As I have said before, I think he is one of the most dangerous men in America. On this issue of Trump’s racist immigration and deportation policy, he is not only complicit, he is a co-conspirator.

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Theoretically yes, but it also depends on what percentage of Republicans vote no.

 

In that vein, there are already 5 Republican senators on the record as refusing to vote for another 30-day continuing resolution just to avoid a shutdown at 11:59:59 p.m. on 1/19/18. That means that McConnell would, at best, have only 46 votes, well below the 51-vote simple majority, so complaining about the 60-vote filibuster threshold seems misplaced.

 

Contrast that with the 7 Republican senators who are on record in support of the bipartisan Graham-Durbin comprehensive immigration reform bill, all but ensuring that it would pass the Senate. Yet, this won't even be brought to the floor for a vote because of the President's flip-flop on the matter last week.

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In a nutshell ...

When Washington is this broken, it's always the most vulnerable who get hurt.

 

... This time around, it's at least 700,000 people brought to the US illegally as children and children who get their health care through a long running insurance program who've been dragged into the partisan crossfire as Congress fails to fulfill its basic function, providing continuous governance.

 

They are being used as bargaining chips as Republican leaders in Congress seek to fund the government, possibly yet again on a short term extension, and Democrats seek to use a moment of high political leverage.

 

-- Stephen Collinson, CNN, January 19, 2018

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The possibility the US government will be shut down later today is a very serious matter that will effect the least privileged in society. Meanwhile the blame game goes on. CNNreports 34% of Americans blame the Democrats while a lesser percentage blame Republicans. How can this be? It is truly amazing. The best explanation I have seen of this phenomenon is in David Frum's new book, Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic.

Frum is a conservative but gives a fair-handed account about how the American experiment is on a downward slope and why. Truly sad!

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I spent nearly forty years in the private sector, most of them successful, and never once did I get paid to find someone else to blame for my failures. I got paid to make sure my company and its stakeholders were successful.

 

For some reason, many DC politicians seem to think they're doing their job when they find somebody to blame. They're not, and it's time for the folks they work for (us) to let them know that's not why we hired (elected) them.

 

As far as I can tell, Mitch McConnell's job is to bring legislation to the Senate floor that passes. If it takes fifty-one votes, he needs to massage it until it gets fifty-one votes. If it takes sixty votes, he needs to massage it until it gets sixty votes.

 

In the case of the current budget legislation that needs sixty votes, he can succeed with fifty-one Republican votes, seven Democratic votes, and two Independent votes.

 

Or he can do it with forty Republican votes, nineteen Democratic votes, and one Independent vote.

 

There are dozens of combinations that will work and finding just one of them will make him a success. Inability to find one will make him a failure. With no one else to blame.

 

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'If anyone objects to any statement I make, I am quite prepared not only to retract it, but also to deny under oath that I ever made it.' - Tom Lehrer

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In the case of the current budget legislation that needs sixty votes, he can succeed with fifty-one Republican votes, seven Democratic votes, and two Independent votes.

 

Or he can do it with forty Republican votes, nineteen Democratic votes, and one Independent vote.

 

There are dozens of combinations that will work and finding just one of them will make him a success. Inability to find one will make him a failure. With no one else to blame.

 

My feeling, though, is that if he does not get 51 republicans on board, he/they can NOT blame the democrats the way they are trying to. Yes, this clearly has to be a bipartisan effort - the r's cannot do this alone. But if there are r's that do not vote yes, there cannot easily be blame along party lines. Unless, of course, they're being petty - which is par for the course, unfortunately.

 

It's also very revealing that MSNBC (and surely other outlets) have been playing trump's remarks from the last shutdown, where he clearly said that the blame falls on THE PRESIDENT. Now, of course, he's done a 180 in the current context. Again, par for the course.

 

And speaking of par, I understand that the shithole-in-chief has decided to at least postpone his flight to Mara Lago for the moment. How nice of him. How ironic, though, that this whole thing is taking place on the cusp of the official start of his 2nd year in office, and he's planning a big money-grubbing celebration in honor of that.

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Washington Post

 

PowerPost

Government shutdown looms as Trump sets a meeting with Schumer

 

Shutdown deadline: Can the GOP get 60 votes by midnight?

 

 

The House on Jan. 18 passed a short-term spending bill to keep the government running but Senate Democrats say they have enough votes to defeat the measure.

 

By Mike DeBonis, Ed O'Keefe, Erica Werner and Elise Viebeck January 19 at 12:52 PM

 

 

With less than 12 hours before a possible government shutdown, President Trump called Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) at midday Friday and invited him to the White House to discuss striking a deal.

 

The meeting was set to take place as the federal government remained on a path toward closing at midnight. Senate Democrats had rallied against a short-term spending bill that does not offer protections for young undocumented immigrants or address other priorities such as disaster relief, and the House was threatening to adjourn, having already passed the bill Thursday night.

 

Neither Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) nor House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) planned to attend the White House meeting, according to GOP aides, leaving Schumer in a position of relative influence.

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As far as I can tell, Mitch McConnell's job is to bring legislation to the Senate floor that passes. If it takes fifty-one votes, he needs to massage it until it gets fifty-one votes. If it takes sixty votes, he needs to massage it until it gets sixty votes.

 

McConnell has the same problems every other Senate Majority Leader has tried to solve. As to the two Independent senators, McConnell will not convince Bernie Sanders and perhaps not Angus King either. So Schumer is vital.

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