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Cornel West: America's Spiritual Meltdown And The Call For Renewal


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https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/14/america-is-spiritually-bankrupt-we-must-fight-back-together

 

America is spiritually bankrupt. We must fight back together

 

"The political triumph of Donald Trump is a symbol and symptom – not cause or origin – of our imperial meltdown. Trump is neither alien nor extraneous to American culture and history. In fact, he is as American as apple pie.

 

He is a sign of our spiritual bankruptcy – all spectacle and no substance, all narcissism and no empathy, all appetite and greed and no wisdom and maturity. His triumph flows from the implosion of a Republican party establishment beholden to big money, big military and big scapegoating of vulnerable peoples of color, LGBTQ peoples, immigrants, Muslims, and women.

 

It also flows from a Democratic party establishment beholden to big money, big military, and the clever deployment of peoples of color, LGBTQ peoples, immigrants, Muslims and women to hide and conceal the lies and crimes of neoliberal policies here and abroad; and from a corporate media establishment that aided and abetted Trump owing to high profits and revenues.

 

The painful truth is there is no Donald Trump without Barack Obama, no neofascist stirrings without neoliberal policies – all within the imperial zone. Obama was the brilliant black smiling face of the American empire. Trump is the know-nothing white cruel face of the American empire.

 

Our last and only hope is prophetic fightback – a moral and spiritual awakening that puts a premium on courageous truth telling and exemplary action by individuals and communities.

 

So how do we respond to our dark times?

 

The greatest tradition of prophetic fightback in the American empire is the black freedom struggle. The Movement for Black Lives is a grand sign of hope. It is an exemplary collective effort to put prophetic fight back in our bleak moment of imperial meltdown and spiritual blackout. The prophetic vision and social analyses of the Movement for Black Lives begin with the most vulnerable, such as the precious LGBTQ people subject to massive trauma and terror."

 

This is a great article from a radical Black thinker. I cut and pasted the parts that most resonated for me. But the whole article is worth reading in it's entirety.

 

Cornell West got a lot of shit during the Obama years for not being a big fan of Obama's neoliberal policies. Right wingers saw Obama as anti-corporate, even though the stock market flourished. West saw Obama as a corporatist neoliberal.

 

Like all prophets, West says unpopular shit that looks better in hindsight. The idea that there was a spiritual rot in America that was disguised by the nice family in the White House in Obama's time isn't as hard to believe now that the family in the White House is, well, not so nice.

 

You can make a decent argument that part of the problem with Obama was it made it seem like the goal was as "simple" as just getting a Black in the White House. To the extent that you see that as the "problem," Trump is the solution. He has taken away the ability of the majority of Americans to feel good about who we are. He has exposed spiritual rot that he did not cause, but that he does personify.

 

I have long believed that for whatever reason - the existence of slavery for half of US history would be a good place to start - the great moral awakenings in US culture often seem to start in the Black community. It makes sense that it starts there. That is where oppression and poverty are experienced most strongly, and that is where a powerful spiritual tradition exemplified by leaders like MLK offers hope and a path forward and a will to struggle and redeem.

 

So it is no surprise to see Doug Jones win ............. because of the the work of Black women. It is no surprise to see Oprah capture the hearts of America. It is no surprise that Black Lives Matter is at the cutting edge of defining the next generation of progressive political change and leadership.

 

This doesn't mean that Oprah will be President, or that Democrats will take over every Senate seat in the deep South. But it does mean that the signs are growing that we are in for a rocky ride, and a period of moral renewal led by Blacks and progressives.

 

I can't wait.

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Trump is neither alien nor extraneous to American culture and history. In fact, he is as American as apple pie.

 

I usually enjoy Cornell West's writing, but he has forgotten the strength of the far right during the depression. I was too young.

 

But, I do remember my grandparents were not eligible for social security because they had already retired when the legislation was signed into law. Their business had failed because of my grandfather's drinking. So they were totally dependent on their children. (I was the second youngest grandchild.)

Edited by WilliamM
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And now, let's throw some shit at the wall to see what sticks from the conservative side:

 

Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America?

 

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html

 

"Guess which state has the highest poverty rate in the country? Not Mississippi, New Mexico, or West Virginia, but California, where nearly one out of five residents is poor. That’s according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which factors in the cost of housing, food, utilities and clothing, and which includes noncash government assistance as a form of income.

 

Given robust job growth and the prosperity generated by several industries, it’s worth asking why California has fallen behind, especially when the state’s per-capita GDP increased approximately twice as much as the U.S. average over the five years ending in 2016 (12.5%, compared with 6.27%).

 

It’s not as though California policymakers have neglected to wage war on poverty. Sacramento and local governments have spent massive amounts in the cause. Several state and municipal benefit programs overlap with one another; in some cases, individuals with incomes 200% above the poverty line receive benefits. California state and local governments spent nearly $958 billion from 1992 through 2015 on public welfare programs, including cash-assistance payments, vendor payments and “other public welfare,” according to the Census Bureau. California, with 12% of the American population, is home today to about one in three of the nation’s welfare recipients."

 

In fairness to California, it is not the "official" poverty capital of America. According to this list, Mississippi is, among the 50 states.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_poverty_rate

 

As the article acknowledges, California (unlike Texas or Mississippi) tends to have policies that are more welcoming to poor people - like welfare and expanded Medicaid. So it should not be a surprise that, as a result, more poor people choose to live in California.

 

But when you factor in the cost of housing and other necessities, California looks relatively worse. That boils down to three simple things: location, location, and location.

 

The op-ed piece above seeks to blame this on Democratic policy, like not requiring welfare recipients to work, government bureaucracy, and land use planning that causes property values to skyrocket.

 

While there is validity to these points, it just skims the surface. I own rental homes in areas of California where land use and land scarcity is not that big of an issue - like in the desert. Rents are still going up like crazy, in part precisely because of the growing economy.

 

I just rented out two homes, one in Sacramento and one in the desert, and I could not believe the amount of demand - almost desperation - for good homes in not so great areas. In one case, I rented a home for $1495, which was $500 more than I rented a comparable home half a mile away for about 4 years ago. The stability of the applicants, and the amount they are willing to pay, blew my mind. The family I rented to is a Black middle class family with two solid jobs and an obviously strong work ethic and set of spiritual beliefs. When we signed a lease, the tenant asked me, "Why did you choose us?" I wasn't going to say what I actually felt, which is that I felt lucky to have such strong applicants compared to 4 years ago.

 

Meanwhile, the other nearby unit, which I rent for $995, is a comparably nice house, and is occupied by a White couple on Section 8. They only were able to get Section 8 because the husband is a veteran who has severe injuries from fighting in the Vietnam War. The share of the rent they pay actually just went up from $600 a month to $850, and when I got notice of that I called the wife to make sure she was going to be okay. She told me that Section 8 jacked up her rent share because she got more work, and she was actually hoping to get off Section 8 completely in a year or two.

 

Meanwhile, I just had another Black tenant move out of a house in Sacramento. The rent was $1350, which was itself slightly below market. Of that, for most of the 3 years she lived there, my tenant actually paid only about $350 - the rest was paid by Section 8. Last Fall Section 8 raised her share of the rent to $750 a month, or about half the unit's actual market rent. What utterly amazed me is that my tenant decided to move her and her two daughters into a 2 bedroom apartment. The economics worked out that she got the same amount of subsidy, but paid less rent since it was a smaller unit in an apartment complex.

 

I try not to moralize about my tenants and their life choices, and I try to help at the margin when I can - like waiving part of a month's rent when they have a health or job crisis or keeping the rent below market rates. I simply could not fathom why somebody relatively young and able bodied would feel they could not afford to earn $750 a month to live in large, nice 3 bedroom home she clearly enjoyed living in. It did communicate something to me, right or wrong, about "welfare mentality." The new tenant moving in is also a Black woman with a stable job and 3 teenage kids. I jacked up the rent to $1550 a month, which is still on the low end of market rent. My new tenant is gushing about how happy she is to live in the house, which is much bigger and nicer than the shit hole (literally - there was feces coming up in her front yard, apparently due to a broken sewer pipe) she was living in.

 

I feel like I know just enough about my tenants' lives to be basically ignorant. But it underscores a few points to me about why Cornel West is right.

 

First, I consider myself lucky to be among the privileged White few. I feel like I made wise choices and earned it, but I also knew something about working the system. Particularly in Sacramento, my tenants' lives tell a different story: they are White, Black, and Hispanic hard working families that all bought homes and lost them due to being suckered into predatory lending. They are all very decent families who did not deserve what they had to endure.

 

Meanwhile, my livelihood and good fortune depends on a bunch of people who are mostly working very hard, and who are all living on the edge - and that is when times are good. When the economy tips into recession, which it will sooner rather than later, I'm pretty sure some of these good people are going to fall over the edge. And the people I am talking about are all ones that are working class to middle class.

 

It is inexcusable that a liberal state like California has such a high poverty rate - whether it is 35 of 50, or 50 of 50. It speaks to the fact that there is a whole layer of people who have been left behind, even in economically strong states when times are good.

 

It also underscores that the time of moral and economic reckoning is coming.

Edited by stevenkesslar
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https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/14/america-is-spiritually-bankrupt-we-must-fight-back-together

 

America is spiritually bankrupt. We must fight back together

 

"The political triumph of Donald Trump is a symbol and symptom – not cause or origin – of our imperial meltdown. Trump is neither alien nor extraneous to American culture and history. In fact, he is as American as apple pie.

 

He is a sign of our spiritual bankruptcy – all spectacle and no substance, all narcissism and no empathy, all appetite and greed and no wisdom and maturity. His triumph flows from the implosion of a Republican party establishment beholden to big money, big military and big scapegoating of vulnerable peoples of color, LGBTQ peoples, immigrants, Muslims, and women.

 

It also flows from a Democratic party establishment beholden to big money, big military, and the clever deployment of peoples of color, LGBTQ peoples, immigrants, Muslims and women to hide and conceal the lies and crimes of neoliberal policies here and abroad; and from a corporate media establishment that aided and abetted Trump owing to high profits and revenues.

 

The painful truth is there is no Donald Trump without Barack Obama, no neofascist stirrings without neoliberal policies – all within the imperial zone. Obama was the brilliant black smiling face of the American empire. Trump is the know-nothing white cruel face of the American empire.

 

Our last and only hope is prophetic fightback – a moral and spiritual awakening that puts a premium on courageous truth telling and exemplary action by individuals and communities.

 

So how do we respond to our dark times?

 

The greatest tradition of prophetic fightback in the American empire is the black freedom struggle. The Movement for Black Lives is a grand sign of hope. It is an exemplary collective effort to put prophetic fight back in our bleak moment of imperial meltdown and spiritual blackout. The prophetic vision and social analyses of the Movement for Black Lives begin with the most vulnerable, such as the precious LGBTQ people subject to massive trauma and terror."

 

This is a great article from a radical Black thinker. I cut and pasted the parts that most resonated for me. But the whole article is worth reading in it's entirety.

 

Cornell West got a lot of shit during the Obama years for not being a big fan of Obama's neoliberal policies. Right wingers saw Obama as anti-corporate, even though the stock market flourished. West saw Obama as a corporatist neoliberal.

 

Like all prophets, West says unpopular shit that looks better in hindsight. The idea that there was a spiritual rot in America that was disguised by the nice family in the White House in Obama's time isn't as hard to believe now that the family in the White House is, well, not so nice.

 

You can make a decent argument that part of the problem with Obama was it made it seem like the goal was as "simple" as just getting a Black in the White House. To the extent that you see that as the "problem," Trump is the solution. He has taken away the ability of the majority of Americans to feel good about who we are. He has exposed spiritual rot that he did not cause, but that he does personify.

 

I have long believed that for whatever reason - the existence of slavery for half of US history would be a good place to start - the great moral awakenings in US culture often seem to start in the Black community. It makes sense that it starts there. That is where oppression and poverty are experienced most strongly, and that is where a powerful spiritual tradition exemplified by leaders like MLK offers hope and a path forward and a will to struggle and redeem.

 

So it is no surprise to see Doug Jones win ............. because of the the work of Black women. It is no surprise to see Oprah capture the hearts of America. It is no surprise that Black Lives Matter is at the cutting edge of defining the next generation of progressive political change and leadership.

 

This doesn't mean that Oprah will be President, or that Democrats will take over every Senate seat in the deep South. But it does mean that the signs are growing that we are in for a rocky ride, and a period of moral renewal led by Blacks and progressives.

 

I can't wait.

 

In several threads, I have talked about spiritual bankruptcy and loss of hope. David Brooks has had several columns in the NY Times with a similar theme. The problems in " The West" in general and the U.S. in specific are cultural and spiritual. We are losing our core moral groundings.

 

The writers I have mentioned before are:

Viktor Frankl and his insistence on "hope" as what a society needs

 

Jonathan Sacks and his ideas for moving beyond our adversarial culture (see his book "The Home We Build Together").

 

In 2016, I liked Joe Biden and John Kasich as I saw to men who could bring us together and help bind wounds and start a healing process. That is why I like Oprah who would be in that same mold: a healer. We need a leader who could bring humanity back into our lives.

 

I agree with your choice example of ML King with his powerful spiritual tradition offering hope on the path to national redemption. Without such a leader, we are on an express train to our destruction.

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Cornel West is a very smart philosopher and a complete political disaster area.

 

When Bernie got his ass kicked in the 2016 primary, West endorsed freakin' Jill Stein in 2016, helping to elect Trump. (Thus his complaint in the posted essay above about "a corporate media establishment that aided and abetted Trump owing to high profits and revenues" is, even if true, embarrassing coming from a guy who himself aided and abetted Trump. Thanks Cornel. Hope you're happy.

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Cornel West is a very smart philosopher and a complete political disaster area.

 

When Bernie got his ass kicked in the 2016 primary, West endorsed freakin' Jill Stein in 2016, helping to elect Trump. (Thus his complaint in the posted essay above about "a corporate media establishment that aided and abetted Trump owing to high profits and revenues" is, even if true, embarrassing coming from a guy who himself aided and abetted Trump. Thanks Cornel. Hope you're happy.

 

Typical that you (“liked” by your puppy dog WilliamM) take a questionable idea that Stein helped elect Trump to attack West personally. The thread was started to discuss an idea that we have a spiritual and moral problem. Why not discuss the issue at hand rather than level a classic personal attack as a diversion?

 

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/jill-stein-democratic-spoiler-or-scapegoat/

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Typical that you (“liked” by your puppy dog WilliamM) take a questionable idea that Stein helped elect Trump to attack West personally

 

Yesterday I wrote a response to the subject, and then realized it did not fit after @stevenkesslar's very long explanation about the cost of living in California.

Edited by WilliamM
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Yesterday I wrote a response to the subject, and then realized it did not fit after @stevenkesslar's very long explanation about the cost of living in California.

 

What does this post have to do with the very questionable idea that not only did Jill Stein throw the election to Trump but also that West’s support for her made a difference to drive votes to her?

 

You did post on Steven’s original idea before he posted about California???

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It's easy, advocating for, or voting for Jill Stein in a state where the vote is close was a vote for Trump. As would voting for a marginal conservative candidate be a vote for Hillary. If you are in a safe state, blue or red, a vote for a minor party is a protest. Otherwise it's a vote for the other side. Some people think that the main parties are equally culpable. They are not. Some people maintain that both main parties are war mongers. That may be true, but the chances of electing a non-war mongering candidate are zero. If you are prepared to vote for a minor candidate (effectively abstain) you are effectively voting for the major party you least like. Think about it.

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Think about it.

 

One thing we can be sure of is that Cornel West has thought about it.

 

I agree with your point, which is that if you don't want to choose between what some see as the Republican Warmonger Party, and what others see as the Democratic Warmonger Party, that doesn't leave you a whole lot of choice. At least in the US.

 

And the idea that a third party will magically appear and win seems like wishful thinking. Bernie and Donnie were smart enough to figure out that their best chance was to try to co-opt an existing major party.

 

It's now very easy for me to say these words: "I'm glad Hillary Clinton lost."

 

I voted for Hillary in both the California primary and the general election. I was not glad she lost on election night, or for months after. But as every week passes and the impact of Trump becomes more clear, my internal emotional compass has moved from grief to acceptance to ambivalence to a sense that something bigger is going on here. Whether it had to happen this way or not, it did happen this way. And it provides an opportunity to call things into question at a deeper level.

 

Cornel West has staked out an intentionally and explicitly radical and prophetic perspective. He clearly isn't going for ratings in being the Black guy who attacks Obama as the smiling face of Warmonger America. I like him as much as Ta-Nehisi Coates, which is to say I like him a lot. But I actually think West is even more radical, and actually even more grounded in movement psychology. West writes more about external struggles, whereas Coates writes a lot about internal struggles with identity. They are both good things to write about. But West is explicitly begging for a mass movement. The other thing we know about the US is that is how change actually happens.

 

There are people I know who are what I view as intellectual dilettantes who say things like this: "I agree with most of the goals of Black Lives Matter. But I don't support the movement or leaders. I am interested in the ideas." That's a wonderful concept. Except for the idea that very few important ideas have virgin births. They are born out of movements, struggles, even wars. (See War, Revolutionary). Talk about being a warmonger! My point is that West is basically issuing a moral call to arms.

 

http://www.rollcall.com/news/politics/the-democrats-savior

 

The Democrats’ Savior

Donald Trump gave Democrats what they could not give themselves: unity

 

This article is saying what a lot of articles I read these days are saying: the Democrats should thank God for Donald Trump. We can thank Trump and the reckoning he helped create for Senator Doug Jones. If we instead had President Clinton, past experience in 1994 and 2010 suggests we could instead look forward to a Democratic bloodbath this Fall. So on a partisan level, I think the point is well grounded. Democrats should pray that Trump continues to be Trump.

 

But what West is talking about goes way deeper than partisanship. Bigjoey mentioned John Kasich. I give Kasich the benefit of the doubt, and assume he is every bit as sincere as West, even though he clearly plays it safer with his rhetoric. I think he's also going for a mainstream version of the idea that it is time for a moral reckoning. To his credit, Kasich is good at the rhetoric of how we don't leave people behind just because they are unemployed or opioid addicts. By Republican standards, there is evidence that he has actually put money and deeds behind his rhetoric.

 

It remains to be seen how or whether this influences the Democratic primary in 2020.

 

I feel pretty certain this won't have any influence on the Republican primary. If Trump doesn't run again, for whatever reason, it will be somebody like Pence that stays the course the Republicans are on. They are not itching to change. They are mostly enjoying watching Trump flip over the table. If they lose many of their moderates in 2018, they will became an even purer version of a Christian Moron Party.

 

So I'm biased, but I think the opportunity for transformation comes from the outside, and in 2020 that's the Democratic Party. West's point is that if all we do is find an Establishment Obama (Cory Booker?) and run on contempt for Trump, that's not really a moral awakening.

 

He's right.

Edited by stevenkesslar
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It's now very easy for me to say these words: "I'm glad Hillary Clinton lost."

 

“Senator Dicky Durbin totally misrepresented what was said at the DACA meeting,” Trump tweeted. “Deals can’t get made when there is no trust! Durbin blew DACA and is hurting our Military.”

 

Long range strategy is important, but so is what is happening right now with Donald Trump, rather than Hillary Clinton in the White House.

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It's now very easy for me to say these words: "I'm glad Hillary Clinton lost."

 

Many clueless white people feel that way, just as many clueless white people thought protest votes -- not just Bernie, Stein or Johnson but, yes, Trump -- were just a swell idea.

 

Clueless white people don't need to worry about being deported to El Salvador for the crime of being a child. Clueless white people get to be clueless without worrying about bigots being placed on the Supreme Court. Clueless white people get to keep their heads down for the next couple of years without worrying that it might somehow be chopped off. Clueless white people are mostly concerned with themselves.

 

It's now very easy for me to say these words: "Clueless white people put Donald Trump in the White House."

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The Democrats’ Savior

Donald Trump gave Democrats what they could not give themselves: unity

 

Poor Stuart Rothenberg. "Yes, Trump’s cultural message resonated with people on the political fringe, but it also reflected the views of average Americans..." You know, white people. Apparently brown and black people aren't "average Americans" in Stu's world.

 

Perhaps Trump's cultural message reflected the views of average white Americans, Stu, but if so, be specific.

Edited by Kenny
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I guess that's why Flake votes with Trump more than 90% of the time. Flake admires Trump's decency.

 

Exactly...I don't care what he says, it's what he does that matters.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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I guess that's why Flake votes with Trump more than 90% of the time. Flake admires Trump's decency.

 

Flake and other Republican Trump "critics" have been voting for the agenda most of them have been drooling about since Gingrich's heyday or even before that. It's misleading to say they are voting with Trump; rather, he has embraced and in his own clumsy way promoted their 30 year old agenda.

Edited by Awwshuck

“Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

 

-The Marx Brothers

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Exactly...I don't care what he says, it's what he does that matters.

 

https://twitter.com/elainaplott/status/936257683505778693

 

William F Buckley and Jeff Flake went skinny dipping in the Long Island Sound!

 

Well, I'm not sure how I feel about Flake getting naked with William F. Buckley.

 

Sounds pretty indecent to me.

 

http://img.thedailybeast.com/image/upload/v1493136559/articles/2009/10/14/dcs-new-beefcake/oconnor-congressman-jeff-flake_56227_l4ch7a.jpg http://thehill.com/images/stories/capital_living/2009/flakesurvivor/photo19_crop.jpg

 

yoJC2uNKCH6n6qcTwA.gif

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Of course, that's not what "misnomer" means, but why expect more from an Administration even dumber than Bush II?

 

By the way, that was a typo by a White House intern related to the Palins. The youngun did not type what I had dictated. The post has been updated to reflect my original wording.

“Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”

 

-The Marx Brothers

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https://twitter.com/elainaplott/status/936257683505778693

 

William F Buckley and Jeff Flake went skinny dipping in the Long Island Sound!

 

Well, I'm not sure how I feel about Flake getting naked with William F. Buckley.

 

Sounds pretty indecent to me.

 

http://img.thedailybeast.com/image/upload/v1493136559/articles/2009/10/14/dcs-new-beefcake/oconnor-congressman-jeff-flake_56227_l4ch7a.jpg http://thehill.com/images/stories/capital_living/2009/flakesurvivor/photo19_crop.jpg

 

yoJC2uNKCH6n6qcTwA.gif

Flake and Buckley are birds of a GOP feather: You can be racist, but just be polite about it. The "soul of the Republican Party" now being fought over is not about white supremacy, it's about genteel country club manners. Trump has brassy and vulgar country clubs, Buckley's were Upson Downs country clubs.

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It's now very easy for me to say these words: "I'm glad Hillary Clinton lost."

 

I voted for Hillary in both the California primary and the general election. I was not glad she lost on election night, or for months after. But as every week passes and the impact of Trump becomes more clear, my internal emotional compass has moved from grief to acceptance to ambivalence to a sense that something bigger is going on here. Whether it had to happen this way or not, it did happen this way. And it provides an opportunity to call things into question at a deeper level.

 

And while you spend time surmising over a Hillary loss and debate the intellectual and political nuances of what we are living through.

 

This happens...

 

 

 

My internal emotional compass never turned to acceptance or ambivalence or even grief, I've remained outraged from day one. He has been doing repairable damage to this country every single day since he discovered birther-ism.

 

"If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention"

 

Source:

Edited by bigvalboy

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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"If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention"

 

Thank you guys for making my point. The level of outrage is building to epic, tsunami levels.

 

We have seen this before.

 

Remember this?

 

o-BUSH-MISSION-ACCOMPLISHED-facebook.jpg

 

And this?

 

iraq_warVistims_children.jpg

 

And how it led to this?

 

http://inthesetimes.com/images/web/web/obama_chicago.jpg

 

tears-of-joy-48.jpg

 

I suppose the Kennycrats among us will argue that Steven Kesslar loves war, loves dead Iraqi children, loves deported Mexicans, loves pain, loves misery. I wished for all of this, and personally advised W. and Trump on how to maximize the amount of death and agony, particularly among innocent children. (Besides, I voted for Obama, twice, and he was correctly labelled "Deporter In Chief." Wasn't he?)

 

http://www.commonsenseevaluation.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/The-Real-Deporter-and-Chief-1.jpg

 

http://www.aljazeera.com/mritems/Images/2017/1/14/780d64b21f3b4362a3c112ee1d04db09_18.jpg

 

Or you could argue that a bunch of Kennycrats had their heads up their asses all through 2016 and just assumed, stupidly, that bad shit couldn't happen and that of course "my girl" was gonna win - despite all evidence that she was in trouble. Including daily polls and incredible amounts of anecdotal evidence - including from people like her husband and her husband's pollster, Stan Greenberg. Of course, that's if one was willing to actually listen to the anger and desperation for change being voiced everywhere.

 

Then again, you could drown all that out with one word:

 

"Deplorables!"

 

So if you want to blame me for the fact that I voted for Hillary, twice, and she lost, go ahead. It's my fault.

 

On top of my industry service award for being a good whore, I just want you sorry Clinton apologists to drag your asses to my house this November and blame me real good for the Republican bloodbath that is going to unfold. That is where the tsunami of outrage seems to be headed. And that's just the first wave.

 

The main point, though, is that instead of playing a blame game or demonizing people, left or right, I'm with Cornel and Oprah.

 

The moral challenge is about how we unify and rise to the challenge, and come out of this horrible mess better than how we started.

 

Sorry about your sense of moral indignation, though.

 

Here's a good website to debate the intellectual and political nuances of. He might win, and it might make you feel better.

 

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/lamb-for-congress-1

Edited by stevenkesslar
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