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Another great one leaves us. RIP Philip Seymour Hoffman.


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http://nypost.com/2014/02/02/philip-seymour-hoffman-found-dead-in-his-apartment/

 

The demons are inside us all. The outward projection of ourselves is just an illusion.

 

Let go. Let those guilty thoughts out.

 

Dependency then developed to cope with suppressed emotions and stresses, the pressure is great on many.

 

No one said this world would be easy.

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"My soul is in good shape"...Philip Seymour Hoffman.

 

Loved him in "Capote" and so many other memorable roles. Just brilliant, and gone too soon.

 

"Judge not, lest ye be judged"...

 

Thank you for posting Rapscallion....May he rest in peace.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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And another one lost to drugs. WHY???????? It is just so frustrating and horribly, horribly sad.

 

RIP PSH.

 

Does it have anything to do possibly with the 'artistic temperament'? And in that case does that also explain the attraction drugs hold for so many young gay men?

 

Gman

Gman

 

In brightest day, in blackest night, No evil shall escape my sight. Let those who worship evil's might, Beware my power, The Great Gazoo is always right!!!!

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I sing the song

because I love the man

I know that some

of you don't understand

Milk-blood

to keep from running out.

 

I've seen the needle

And the damage done

A little part of it in everyone

But every junkie's

Like a settin' sun.

 

------ Neil Young "Needle and the damage done" ------

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'Doubt'....

 

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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The demons are inside us all. The outward projection of ourselves is just an illusion.

 

No one said this world would be easy.

 

He was obviously one of the world's most talented actors, and his loss is a great one. I must confess, however, to have far less sympathy when someone with PSH's means, intelligence, and education decides to self-medicate with highly dangerous substances, rather than to avail himself of the many other resources at his disposal, than for someone without his many gifts. Many thousands die of drug addiction every year. Few had the number of options and the breadth of support PSH had. It doesn't make his death any less tragic, but I have to admit that it somehow changes the way I feel about it.

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Philip Seymour Hoffman's death hits me more personally than other celebrity passings. He went to a high school which neighbours the one I attended and he often returned to encourage young people to follow their dreams, whether in theatre or science or dance or writing. Rochester NY does not have a large number of world-famous people and his presence here was always note-worthy, but he never played the "returning star." He was modest, unassuming and genuine and grateful for the support and love he received from his family and friends.

His talent will be missed and the film and theatre world will be diminished by his absence.

Let us praise his contributions and cherish the work he leaves. Can we leave it at that?

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Guest Starbuck

I watched the Academy Awards clip that MalcomXpark posted and there was Heath Ledger, nominated in the same category for Brokeback Mountain that year. It reminded me that the greatest loss is not to fans or film-goers, but to the four young children of these two fathers. RIP.

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And another one lost to drugs. WHY???????? It is just so frustrating and horribly, horribly sad.

 

RIP PSH.

On every front, it is sad. From the roles he played as a person, actor, and husband and father. As far as the why???. I don't have any questions. Being a recovering person, and having just about every opportunity, at several junctions to grab onto help I did not. I "incurred" multiple OD's, and believe I could have been PSH. Having every opportunity to reach out for help since I had the funds, insurance, family support,in these situations does not exist. in the moment at hand. I understand, and I do sympathize and empathize. Rand
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Guys get ready to come and get me

 

I’m just a little sick and tired of hearing and reading what a great and sad tragedy the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman was. In my eyes the far greater tragedy is the silent death, by overdose, of the destitute skid row resident. When the Seymour Hoffman’s and the Heath Ledger’s, of this world, die, from a drug overdose, many pound their chests and lament all the demons with which these people had to live. Bull shit – we all live with demons and most of us manage to survive. It appears to me that the demons with which they live are 1.) too much money, 2.) too much time, and worst of all 3.) too much self-indulgence. The tragedy here is how these deaths affect the lives of partners, children and extended families. Obviously Seymour Hoffman and Ledger never bothered considering anybody other than themselves and their “inconsolable pain”.

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Phillip Seymour Hoffman Battled Drug Addiction Most Of His Life: In And Out Of Rehab

by Amanda Austin

 

Family, friends, and fans of Phillip Seymour Hoffman are mourning the untimely death of the actor. Hoffman’s body was discovered late this Sunday morning by a friend at his apartment, the troubled actor was found with a heroin needle in his arm, and his death is being labeled as a drug overdose.

 

Phillip Seymour Hoffman has battled with substance abuse off and on throughout his life. In 2006 the Oscar Winner confessed that he was no stranger to drug addiction in an exclusive interview on CBS’s 60 Minutes. After the actor graduated from acting school at New York University he slipped into a dark drug fueled time in his life. He told CBS, “I went to rehab, I got sober when I was 22 years old. You get panicked… and I got panicked for my life. It really was just that.”

 

After getting sober at the young age of 22, the actor claimed to stay drug free for 23 years, until he recently “fell off the wagon,” in the Spring of 2013. In May of 2013 we reported that Phillip Seymour Hoffman had checked himself into a rehab on the East Coast. Hoffman claimed that he sought out help when he began abusing prescription drugs, which quickly escalated to snorting heroin. Hoffman spent ten days in the detox facility last May, and then checked himself out, claiming to have conquered his addiction once again.

 

Anyone who is familiar with heroin abuse can tell you that for an addiction that strong it takes much longer than a ten day detox to cure it. But, Hoffman checked out after a mere ten days and hopped a plane to Europe to work on his next movie. Although the actor claimed to be sober again, that obviously wasn’t the case, or we wouldn’t be covering his death today.

 

Phillip Seymour Hoffman battled drug addiction for a large portion of his life, and sadly today he lost the battle.

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He was obviously one of the world's most talented actors, and his loss is a great one. I must confess, however, to have far less sympathy when someone with PSH's means, intelligence, and education decides to self-medicate with highly dangerous substances, rather than to avail himself of the many other resources at his disposal, than for someone without his many gifts. Many thousands die of drug addiction every year. Few had the number of options and the breadth of support PSH had. It doesn't make his death any less tragic, but I have to admit that it somehow changes the way I feel about it.

 

Amen, brother, Amen. I have to guiltily admit that while I'm saddened that a young, talented man is gone, my sympathy is somewhat tempered. He was sticking needles in his arms and injecting himself with a substance that everyone knows is dangerous. I understand that addiction is a disease but when you have 3 young children, maybe you should seek and seek and seek and seek and seek treatment for that disease until you can learn to control it. This is a man who had an Academy Award, earned millions of bucks every time he was in a movie, had talent and intelligence and he dies on the bathroom floor. Sad and stupid.

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Guys get ready to come and get me

 

I’m just a little sick and tired of hearing and reading what a great and sad tragedy the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman was. In my eyes the far greater tragedy is the silent death, by overdose, of the destitute skid row resident. When the Seymour Hoffman’s and the Heath Ledger’s, of this world, die, from a drug overdose, many pound their chests and lament all the demons with which these people had to live. Bull shit – we all live with demons and most of us manage to survive. It appears to me that the demons with which they live are 1.) too much money, 2.) too much time, and worst of all 3.) too much self-indulgence. The tragedy here is how these deaths affect the lives of partners, children and extended families. Obviously Seymour Hoffman and Ledger never bothered considering anybody other than themselves and their “inconsolable pain”.

 

Well said.

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Guys get ready to come and get me

 

I’m just a little sick and tired of hearing and reading what a great and sad tragedy the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman was. In my eyes the far greater tragedy is the silent death, by overdose, of the destitute skid row resident. When the Seymour Hoffman’s and the Heath Ledger’s, of this world, die, from a drug overdose, many pound their chests and lament all the demons with which these people had to live. Bull shit – we all live with demons and most of us manage to survive. It appears to me that the demons with which they live are 1.) too much money, 2.) too much time, and worst of all 3.) too much self-indulgence. The tragedy here is how these deaths affect the lives of partners, children and extended families. Obviously Seymour Hoffman and Ledger never bothered considering anybody other than themselves and their “inconsolable pain”.

 

Agreed.

“The mother of idiots is always pregnant.”

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Anyone who is familiar with heroin abuse can tell you that for an addiction that strong it takes much longer than a ten day detox to cure it. But, Hoffman checked out after a mere ten days and hopped a plane to Europe to work on his next movie. Although the actor claimed to be sober again, that obviously wasn’t the case, or we wouldn’t be covering his death today.

 

As some of you may know, a few years ago, before I dealt with my sexuality being a gay man, I was severely depressed. So depressed I spent 5 days in a psych ward to help sort things out (and that was the turning point for me). But one thing I remember about those 5 days was one of my fellow patients. She was in, trying to withdraw from heroin. It was the most frightening things I'd ever seen. The agony she was going through was unbelievable. I understood the phrase where someone said they looked liked "death warmed over". Cause that is what she looked like. And this wasn't her first time trying After witnessing that, I never could understand at all anyone trying drugs like that at all. And how if you do get clean you could ever go back, knowing what the withdrawal was like.

Lee

 

=======

 

A friend is someone who reaches for your hand but touches your heart.

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I worked for countless years at the "Gay and Lesbian Center" in Hollywood. Most often, as one might guess with young men and women that came from all over the country looking for a Hollywood that never existed. Most got strung out on drugs and eventually addicted, everyone at some point went to rehab. I talked with addicts and former addicts for hundreds of hours. With all due respect to those that think otherwise, going back is not always a choice. Being sober and looking in on an addicts world, fogs your perception of the reality. I have argued this point before, and most people who enjoy sobriety don't buy it, and that is fine. People will believe what they want to believe, or what is their reality, or the reality that Philip Seymour Hoffman lived and millions of addicts like him live everyday. Once an addict, you have to fight that addiction the rest of your life...it is never ending. Hoffman was sober for 20 years before he relapsed. An addict can never tell you why he relapses, he just knows that he does. I wish I could find online what Dr. Drew discussed today. It was disturbing, and disheartening, but it's the reality.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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I worked for countless years at the "Gay and Lesbian Center" in Hollywood. Most often' date=' as one might guess with young men and women that came from all over the country looking for a Hollywood that never existed. Most got strung out on drugs and eventually addicted, everyone at some point went to rehab. I talked with addicts and former addicts for hundreds of hours. With all due respect to those that think otherwise, going back is not always a choice. Being sober and looking in on an addicts world, fogs your perception of the reality. I have argued this point before, and most people who enjoy sobriety don't buy it, and that is fine. People will believe what they want to believe, or what is their reality, or the reality that Philip Seymour Hoffman lived and millions of addicts like him live everyday. Once an addict, you have to fight that addiction the rest of your life...it is never ending. Hoffman was sober for 20 years before he relapsed. An addict can never tell you why he relapses, he just knows that he does. I wish I could find online what Dr. Drew discussed today. It was disturbing, and disheartening, but it's the reality.[/i']

 

I agree completely, both from my experience and that of one of my closest friends. I have been sober for more than thirty years, but every single day is a huge struggle. My friend, whom I met in Vietnam in 1968, has had it much worse. He's done some amazing things -- sailing around the world with his wife by themseves for seven years, for example. When he's not involved in an adventure like that, it's back to every drug out there. I fear very much that he will not make it through 2014.

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Maybe I misunderstood you, but am I getting it right that you're telling me SOBER people have the fogged perception of reality??????????

 

No, sorry Unicorn I wasn't more clear. What I am saying is that a sober person, or someone who has never experienced addiction, does not have a clear understanding of the world that an addict lives in. It is impossible for him to understand what an addict is going through on a daily basis or what the reality is for the person suffering from addiction. In many respects I understand those that tend to judge addicts, and think that addicts just can stand up and suddenly decide one day that they are going to be sober. Does that happen, sometimes, but the rate of recovery from addiction is dismally low. Just because someone is surrounded by money or friends or opportunity for help, does not mean he is any more likely to get sober than the junkie down on skid row. In many respects the reality that those two people, at far ends of the spectrum share, is the same.

 

Heroin, or meth is not prejudice, it doesn't care who you are or what you are, it knows no social or economic boundaries. It is an equal opportunity drug. From royalty, to the CEO of a company, to the suburban housewife, to the kid on the street, to the junkie down on Skid row, from the moment it enters your body, it has one goal, and that is to kill you...period.

 

As someone else mentioned earlier...."On many fronts this is sad".....My feeling is to let those who have lost their lives to this destructive disease, to just rest in peace. But yet, the reality is, it is difficult not to judge, I understand that. Heroin is rapidly outpacing Meth as the new drug of choice. Like Meth, it is relatively cheap and readily available, so having a discussion as to how or why a person took their life is one that needs to happen.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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