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A Veteran's Day Salute...


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We certainly thank these guys for their service...

 

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FeRv5Cguz-E/TRdRyF6iohI/AAAAAAAAG4I/abpzui3dJ8A/s1600/sexy_soldier.jpg

 

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l2rvazDH1Y1qb5u9eo1_500.jpg

 

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5S3wIVj1-Tk/Ucc876ykBPI/AAAAAAAAMvw/kM3J8Ov9_yc/s1600/muscled-bodybuilder-hunks-army-fatigues-gay-shirtless-soldiers-marines-nature-water-river-strip-beach-bulges-bisexual-macho.jpg

 

http://www.qualiafolk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/gay-soldiers.jpg

IMG_0933_Sig_crop_46x20.jpg "Take it like a man!"
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We certainly thank these guys for their service...

 

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FeRv5Cguz-E/TRdRyF6iohI/AAAAAAAAG4I/abpzui3dJ8A/s1600/sexy_soldier.jpg

 

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l2rvazDH1Y1qb5u9eo1_500.jpg

 

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5S3wIVj1-Tk/Ucc876ykBPI/AAAAAAAAMvw/kM3J8Ov9_yc/s1600/muscled-bodybuilder-hunks-army-fatigues-gay-shirtless-soldiers-marines-nature-water-river-strip-beach-bulges-bisexual-macho.jpg

 

http://www.qualiafolk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/gay-soldiers.jpg

 

Pictures of our friend Dane Michaels shirtless in fatigues are so hot. In person, over the top!! Plus, as LBT pointed out, a heroic veteran. Everyone take time today to give thanks to VETERANS near and far.

 

Boston Bill

Live Your Dreams With Passion And Purpose

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Plus a special Veteran's Day salute to Dane Michaels...

 

Not quite shirtless and wearing fatigues... but one of my favorite pics of an extraordinary individual and vet... Yes, we certainly thank him for his service... and for his other services as well!

 

http://www.men4rentnow.com/fs/288078.485B2B27.jpg

IMG_0933_Sig_crop_46x20.jpg "Take it like a man!"
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There are no more "fatigues"

 

I wholeheartedly join in everyone’s expression of gratitude to our military—whether active duty, retired or former.

 

Perhaps it would be an additional form of respect to use correct words when referring to their uniforms. The last time I recall the term “fatigues” used by the military was, at the latest, during the Vietnam War. Even then, the term was already beginning to fade into history.

 

For at least the past 35 years, the term “camouflaged utilities” (or more simply “cammies” or “utilities”) has been used. Sometimes they’re also called “battler dress uniforms” or “BDUs.”

 

Although the days are long gone when nearly every family had someone in uniform and consequently understood these matters first-hand, I submit it is still a sign of respect for our military heroes to use current terminology when referring to them.

 

Below is a more complete explanation of these terms from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-military-fatigues.htm.

 

Quote:

The phrase "military fatigues" was coined by the United States (US) armed forces in the mid 1800s, and was used in reference to the clothes worn by soldiers detailed to menial or hard labor. Over time, the definition of military fatigues has changed to essentially mean any uniform worn by a soldier on work detail, on duty, or while on the field of battle. The phrase has also become synonymous with the camouflage-patterned clothing found in civilian fashions.

 

Prior to World War II (WWII), the standard US military uniform resembled modern dress uniforms — it was heavy and came with unneeded accessories. Some WWII soldiers actually wound up going into battle in jacket and tie. Following the war, the military began looking into new uniforms for its soldiers, recognizing the fact that there was a need for lighter, more practical attire. The military also began developing camouflage patterns for its uniforms, recognizing the potential effectiveness after coming in contact with German forces that used camouflage uniforms with a high degree of success.

 

While the camouflage uniform saw limited use in the Vietnam War — where the term fatigues took on the meaning of a soldier's basic uniform due to the issuance of Jungle Fatigues — it was not until 1981 that military fatigues took on the modern look. Battle dress uniforms (BDUs) then became the official working uniform of the US military. The original BDU was a woodland-camouflage patterned uniform that came in four variants — temperate, lowland, highland, and delta — and was issued to all branches of the US armed forces. For the next several years, the military would experiment with different versions of the BDU, and in 2003 began the process of issuing unique uniforms to all branches of the armed forces.

 

Modern military fatigues look different depending on the branch of the service. The Marines use the computer-generated Marine pattern (MARPAT) fatigues, and can be recognized by the lighter tone and the pixelated look of the camouflage patterns. Army fatigues are easily recognized by their simple woodland camouflage pattern of dark greens and browns, while the Air Force has a lighter pattern of grays and blues. The Navy's fatigues are a digital pattern of dark-and-light blues, to reflect their stations at sea.

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I do thank Veterans for their service, and also Hardnthick for clueing us in.

 

The curmudgeon in me can't resist pointing out that a goodly number of codgers like me still say "Xeroxes" instead of "Photocopies" and the term fatigues might take a couple more decades to die out.

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I wholeheartedly join in everyone’s expression of gratitude to our military—whether active duty, retired or former.

 

Perhaps it would be an additional form of respect to use correct words when referring to their uniforms. The last time I recall the term “fatigues” used by the military was, at the latest, during the Vietnam War. Even then, the term was already beginning to fade into history.

 

For at least the past 35 years, the term “camouflaged utilities” (or more simply “cammies” or “utilities”) has been used. Sometimes they’re also called “battler dress uniforms” or “BDUs.”

 

Although the days are long gone when nearly every family had someone in uniform and consequently understood these matters first-hand, I submit it is still a sign of respect for our military heroes to use current terminology when referring to them.

 

Below is a more complete explanation of these terms from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-military-fatigues.htm.

 

Quote:

The phrase "military fatigues" was coined by the United States (US) armed forces in the mid 1800s, and was used in reference to the clothes worn by soldiers detailed to menial or hard labor. Over time, the definition of military fatigues has changed to essentially mean any uniform worn by a soldier on work detail, on duty, or while on the field of battle. The phrase has also become synonymous with the camouflage-patterned clothing found in civilian fashions.

 

Prior to World War II (WWII), the standard US military uniform resembled modern dress uniforms — it was heavy and came with unneeded accessories. Some WWII soldiers actually wound up going into battle in jacket and tie. Following the war, the military began looking into new uniforms for its soldiers, recognizing the fact that there was a need for lighter, more practical attire. The military also began developing camouflage patterns for its uniforms, recognizing the potential effectiveness after coming in contact with German forces that used camouflage uniforms with a high degree of success.

 

While the camouflage uniform saw limited use in the Vietnam War — where the term fatigues took on the meaning of a soldier's basic uniform due to the issuance of Jungle Fatigues — it was not until 1981 that military fatigues took on the modern look. Battle dress uniforms (BDUs) then became the official working uniform of the US military. The original BDU was a woodland-camouflage patterned uniform that came in four variants — temperate, lowland, highland, and delta — and was issued to all branches of the US armed forces. For the next several years, the military would experiment with different versions of the BDU, and in 2003 began the process of issuing unique uniforms to all branches of the armed forces.

 

Modern military fatigues look different depending on the branch of the service. The Marines use the computer-generated Marine pattern (MARPAT) fatigues, and can be recognized by the lighter tone and the pixelated look of the camouflage patterns. Army fatigues are easily recognized by their simple woodland camouflage pattern of dark greens and browns, while the Air Force has a lighter pattern of grays and blues. The Navy's fatigues are a digital pattern of dark-and-light blues, to reflect their stations at sea.

 

Sorry I did not research the correct terminology prior to posting, but, IN NOWAY, was it meant to disrespect veterans. Coming from the Vietnam War era, that is the term I remember and many of my friends in this age group continue to use in a casual manner. I'll remember to use politically correct phraseology in the future.

 

Hope your Veterans Day went well.

 

Boston Bill

Live Your Dreams With Passion And Purpose

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