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Adaptive use can be profitable. . .


robberbaron4u
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My young friend reports that he has done well in marketing his "420" table, retro cigarette stands recycled as a must have decorative accessory for the gentleman who prefers to savor "Mary Jane" over "Lucky Strike" in his smoking room. The lad's new adaptive use line makes use of silver-plated ice buckets as urns for cremains; and, I daresay that, given the "tacky" containers offered today by funeral homes, they do present nicely in that use.

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My young friend reports that he has done well in marketing his "420" table, retro cigarette stands recycled as a must have decorative accessory for the gentleman who prefers to savor "Mary Jane" over "Lucky Strike" in his smoking room. The lad's new adaptive use line makes use of silver-plated ice buckets as urns for cremains; and, I daresay that, given the "tacky" containers offered today by funeral homes, they do present nicely in that use.

 

Interesting, as I have been given the care of my friends ashes, and I remember spending days hunting down a respectful and appropriate container that would be a suitable urn for cremains. It was no easy task, finally temporarily settling on a reproduction of an Egyptian urn purchased from the Getty. A more authentic version will be eventually purchased in Cairo, before going on to "Giza" his final resting place.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

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I did this for my wife. Company is owned by a friend. (I tried posting a picture, but I'm obviously technically challenged - Jason Carter, where are you?:))

 

www.crystalremembrance.com

 

The link was perfect....AND I might add a wonderful idea. With all due respect to Robbers friend, this is a nice solution. The ad does say that they are mobile. That thought may not appeal to everyone, but I rather think that a number of people would like that and find it comforting.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

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The link was perfect....AND I might add a wonderful idea. With all due respect to Robbers friend, this is a nice solution. The ad does say that they are mobile. That thought may not appeal to everyone, but I rather think that a number of people would like that and find it comforting.

 

We scattered both of my parents' cremains, as well as those of their two cats, in a state park they liked visiting. My mother pre-deceased my dad by a few years had a nice urn (we found it online - the ones at the crematorium were hideous), but we knew we would scatter my dad and mom when he died, so we didn't bother with an urn, we just scattered. I'm not so sure about the crystal remembrance.

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We scattered both of my parents' cremains, as well as those of their two cats, in a state park they liked visiting. My mother pre-deceased my dad by a few years had a nice urn (we found it online - the ones at the crematorium were hideous), but we knew we would scatter my dad and mom when he died, so we didn't bother with an urn, we just scattered. I'm not so sure about the crystal remembrance.

 

I think for those that want to be cremated, scattering ashes in a place that was special to the deceased brings closure. My friend wants his ashes spread at the base of the Pyramids of Giza. It was no easy task securing transport and state permission from the Egyptian government, unfortunately all hell broke loose in the Arab spring, and now I am forced to wait for the turmoil in Egypt to die down.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

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My father was buried. I declined seeing the body, since he'd been in hospital for two months and refused to see me.

 

Mother died and was cremated. One day, I came home from work, and DPH had left her urn on my doorstep. [They had done the same with my sister's cremains several years earlier]. Mom is in a lovely autumn-tone cloisonne urn. My sister came to visit, and she couldn't find her. "She's on the top shelf", I pointed. "Damn!" my sister remarked, "She fits right into the decorative scheme". Not intended but a nice touch. As of 10/19 this year, she died 9 years ago.

 

My step father, deceased at the age of 96 in 2007, is somewhere in Minnesota and somewhere in Elmhurst, IL, at the Elmhurst college campus, where he helped establish and build their arboretum.

Do not try to the patience of Dragons, for you are Crunchy and good with Ketchup.

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I think for those that want to be cremated, scattering ashes in a place that was special to the deceased brings closure...

 

I agree. My mother was adamant that neither her body nor her cremains were to be put into the ground. Scattering, however, was OK. We contemplated scattering them here in California, but they visited this particular state park several times a year, so my brother, his wife, two kids, and I piled into the minivan and took a trip to the state park. After some hiking around, the kids were shuttled over to the playground by my sister in law and my brother and I did the deed. I played lookout and carried the backpack containing the cremains on my back, while my brother cut the plastic bags open and scattered. The hardest part was waiting for other park visitors to clear out while we scattered. The cats were easy, as was my mom. True to form, my dad proved to be the problem. His bag was thicker, so it took longer to cut the top of the bag off. We couldn't cut the entire seal, so he was more poured than scattered. He always was difficult to get moving.

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My father was buried. I declined seeing the body, since he'd been in hospital for two months and refused to see me.

Mother died and was cremated. One day, I came home from work, and DPH had left her urn on my doorstep. [They had done the same with my sister's cremains several years earlier]. Mom is in a lovely autumn-tone cloisonne urn. My sister came to visit, and she couldn't find her. "She's on the top shelf", I pointed. "Damn!" my sister remarked, "She fits right into the decorative scheme". Not intended but a nice touch. As of 10/19 this year, she died 9 years ago.

 

My step father, deceased at the age of 96 in 2007, is somewhere in Minnesota and somewhere in Elmhurst, IL, at the Elmhurst college campus, where he helped establish and build their arboretum.

 

Seems very sad to me about your father Gallahad. One can only hope that there was some sort of closure. I was blessed to reconcile with my parents before they passed. It was at the urging of my friends, and I thank them to this day.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

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My parents were cremated mainly because my father died a long way from where he wanted to to be buried, and my mother died a long way away from me, when I was too ill to travel, so she was cremated and the funeral home held the cremains for me for a couple of weeks, until I could collect them. In each case, I received the cremains in a simple metal canister within a cardboard box, and I buried both boxes in the family cemetary plot.

 

If I am cremated, I would like to have the cremains separated, with part buried in the family plot, and part scattered in a place that I loved. I understand why someone would want to keep a loved one's remains in an urn, where one could see them, but I would always worry about something happening to the urn (earthquake/fire/flood/accident/burglary, etc.) if I kept it.

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With regard to an Egyptian Revival urn, take note of a current Ebay listing numbered 290943602399.

 

Thank you Robber. The urn needs to be small enough be easily and discreetly transported.

the greatest beauty is

Organic wholeness, the wholeness of life and things,

the divine beauty of the universe.

Love that, not man apart from that,

or else you will share man’s pitiful confusions,

or drown in despair when his days darken."

 

- Robinson Jeffers

 

B e l i e v e

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