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What's a Papi?


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Jizzdepapi uses a term (even in his handle) with which I am not familiar: papi. It appears to come from Spanish, but I can't seem to locate it in my dictionary. There are 2 related words, however.

 

1) The noun papo, which is translated dewlap (itself not a common English word). The aol dictionary gives this definition for dewlap: 1 : loose skin hanging under the neck of an animal. 2 : loose flesh on the human throat. Not an attractive characteristic for an escort, though some likely lads look for dewlap in the great wrinkle wrooms of the world (Twin Peaks, SF; Vagabond, Paris; City of Quebec, London; Town House (and the later lamented Regent East), NYC].

 

2) The verb, papar, which means to swallow or eat without chewing.

 

Could the noun point us to foreskin? I can't begin to imagine where the verb might lead us <grin>.

 

My other guess is that it is related to the familiar term for father: papa. In that case, why use it for a (presumably) younger man?

 

Inquiring minds want to know.

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Guest jizzdepapi

from an earlier post:

 

PAPI = daddy in spanish but is widely used as an affectionate term for any, sometimes an older, latin male; a frequent variation is PAPI CHULO or RICQUITO; both mean handsome man

 

jizz

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Guest jizzdepapi

not familiar with guapo but my spanish is less than very rudimentary so...

 

have heard the term but forget it's meaning.

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Guest Joey Ciccone

>1) The noun papo, which is

>translated dewlap (itself not a

>common English word).

>Could the noun point us to foreskin?

>I can't begin to imagine where the verb might lead us <grin>.

 

Where I grew up (El Paso), papi, along with chi-chi, was slang for tit, nipple, or a knot on the head, which leads us, I would think, to the papacy (of all places!)

Still, the father image looms.

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Guest Joey Ciccone

Guapo means handsome, or less literally, ladies man, stud. A dashing friend of mine in high school was a real hit with the ladies, and we all called him El Guapo. But the language seems to change subtley along with each region it's spoken in, so the word may have other meanings to some.

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There are occasional slang pitfalls throughout the Spanish-speaking world, but in general "papi" or "papito" means "daddy," especially around the Caribbean basin and in Mexico. It's a more familiar/affectionate form of "papá," which mean "dad" or "daddy." In a gay context "papi" can refer to a hot guy, including a hot older guy.

 

"Guapo" means handsome, and in most places you could indeed say "Hola, guapo," if you're flirting with a good-looking guy. In Argentina it's not used much. It seems to have a coarse meaning there. Instead, they use a number of substitutes, including "buenmozo," "carilindo," and "fachero."

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Guest jizzdepapi

Conversation filler for gringos?

 

This little nugget may be of use at those very dull cocktail parties when no one can think of anything to say:

 

The term 'gringo' is reported to have been coined by Puerto Ricans who took note of the presence of Americans from the mainland in the late 19th century.

 

These Puerto Ricans are supposed to have noted that most men from the United States sported trimmed beards, as did Andrew Jackson on the $5 bill. The term 'gringo,' thus, is really 'green' (as in $5 bill) and 'goat,' as in man with beard. Given a thick Puerto Rican accent, 'green goat' became 'gringo.'

 

Now I warned you this was a boring tidbit. Is the conversation more likely to go uphill or downhill after sharing this little nugget?

 

Jizz

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Guest Joey Ciccone

RE: Conversation filler for gringos?

 

>These Puerto Ricans are supposed to

>have noted that most men

>from the United States sported

>trimmed beards, as did Andrew

>Jackson on the $5 bill.

>The term 'gringo,' thus, is

>really 'green' (as in $5

>bill) and 'goat,' as in

>man with beard. Given a

>thick Puerto Rican accent, 'green

>goat' became 'gringo.'

 

Great cocktail talk, jizz. I'm showing Jackson on a $20 though, and he doesn't have a beard. Maybe the government, after realizing the 'gringo' debacle, shaved him and upgraded him from a five to a twenty.

This may be of tenous pertinence, but speaking of yankee greenbacks (as opposed to mexican wetbacks - I can say that - I've crossed illegally dozens of times, and I'm part mexican) makes me think of $50 dollar bills (my mattress is stuffed with them), which feature the image of President Grant. When I think of Grant, I tend to think of him as a Union General, which reminds me of Gen. Joseph E. Hooker, an unremarkable commander in the east, whose name, if not accomplishments, is still with us in the slang of my current trade.

The synonym 'hooker' is used today because of General Hookers inability to run a tight ship. His encampments were notorious for their large entourage of prostitutes. These ever present groupies of the trade came to be known as "Hookers' harlots", and eventually, just plain hookers.

An interesting aside, General Grant would eventually replace Hooker in his position (not successively), then later become president and earn a spot on the fifty dollar bill, where he does in fact resemble a green goat.

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Guest jizzdepapi

RE: Conversation filler for gringos?

 

>...I'm showing Jackson on a $20 though, and he doesn't have a

>beard...

 

thanks for the correction, joey. if i dig them out from under these fritos wrappers, all i have is these fucking $100 bills and bearer coupons with which i pay my hookers...

 

i will clean up, i will clean up, i will clean up (to the tune of "I will survive," of course.)

 

jizz

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Guest WetDream (Guest)

RE: Conversation filler for gringos?

 

Interesting. I read somewhere that "gringo" was coined by Mexicans in the 19th century to refer to the miners/speculators from the U.S. Seems it was a "mishearing" of a favorite folk song of the era sung by the above: Green Grow the Lilacs. Who knows?

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Guest mikenfresno

RE: Conversation filler for gringos?

 

I've heard that 'gringo' actually originated in Spain in the 17th century and is derived from the word griego (meaning greek) and was used to identify any foreigner that didn't speak proper Spanish.

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Guest Konga

RE: Conversation filler for gringos?

 

I've heard it originated at the Alamo, when a marauding Mexican army, in broken english asked the once cocky American soldiers, "What's wrong, yankees? Where'd your "grin go"?"

 

I can't authenticate that story, of course.

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RE: Conversation filler for gringos?

 

As long as we're discussing word origins... I had always heard that "guapo" relates to the ethnic slur "wop".... (the "g" in Spanish is not pronounced as forcibly as in English; "guapo" can almost sound like "woppo")

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Guest Joey Ciccone

RE: Conversation filler for wops?

 

I heard it was the INS who, around the turn of the century, gave the name of wop to Italians in the US illegally, or With Out Papers. Leave it to La Migra.

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RE: Conversation filler for wops?

 

I heard that Hooker, realizing that there were going to be prostitutes whether he tried to legislate them out of existence or not decided to declare that they could ply their trade in a certain part of town only, which came to be called the red light district or Hookerville. Since this was one of the few times in USA history when our trade was intelligently made lawful, I object to your characterization of him, Joey, you usually sexy, inassailably correct thang. Course, I can't document this at the moment.

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Guest Joey Ciccone

RE: Conversation filler for hookers?

 

Assailment accepted Bilbo, but after your, as yet, undocumented tale of attempted intelligence on the part of the gov't., I still stand by my characterization of Hooker. If Hookerville or it's legality were still standing today, I would gladly recant my use of the word unremarkable, which was really in reference to his military achievements, and setting up a red light district can hardly be called a military achievment, although I applaud his efforts. And yours!

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RE: Conversation filler for hookers?

 

Again, given my memory - like a steel seive - it seems to me that this happened in N'Orleans. Anybody from there care to comment? If I am correct, perhaps Hooker was also indirectly responsible for giving us ragtime music, as it started out in the whorehouses of New Orleans, IMHO. I don't believe in slavery, and it would have died out anyway as a financial bummer until Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin (and then invinted the first rifles with interchangeable parts and sold them to the Union). However, I do believe in states rights, which are still being trampled to this day. Therefore, if the man were ineffectual in leading troops in an army which I feel should have lost and temporarily effective in cultural pursuits I believe in ... hell, you're probably still right, Joey.

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