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What are You Reading?


Epigonos

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As anybody who knows me well, knows reading is one of the great joys of my life. I read constantly, frequently two or three books at a time. Thus I’m always looking for new things to read. I frequently get fixated on a topic and attempt to ready everything I can find regarding it – that explains the nine book I have recently read on The Battle of Midway. There are actually two more that I want to read but they are both way out of print and very expensive. Knowing me I will eventually spring for the money because I WANT to read the books.

SO WHAT ARE YOU GUYS READING?

 

I have read these Midway books and greatly enjoyed them:

 

Boreneman, Walter R., “The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King – The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea”.

Buell, Thomas B., “The Quiet Warrior: A Biography of Admiral Raymond A. Spruance”.

Carlson, Elliot, “Joe Rochefort’s War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway”.

Kleiss, N. Jack “Dusty Kleiss, “Never Call Me a Hero: A Legendary American Dive-Bomber Pilot Remembers the Battle of Midway”.

Martell, Ronald E., Showdown in the Pacific War: Nimitz and Yamamoto”.

Potter, E.B., “Nimitz”.

Prange, Gordon W., “Miracle at Midway”.

Rigby, David, “Air Group Commander Wade McClusky and the Battle of Midway”.

Symonds, Craig L., “The Battle of Midway”.

 

I’ve also recently read and enjoyed:

 

Kaufman, Jonathan, “The Last Kings of Shanghai: The Rival Jewish Dynasties that Helped Create Modern China”.

McGrath, Tim: “James Monroe: A Life”.

 

I am about to read:

 

Penn, Thomas, “A Royal Tragedy: The Brothers York”.

Santopietro, Tom, “Considering Doris Day”.

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In my school days, Dad gave a birthday gift of Clay Blair, Jr.'s "Silent Victory", a comprehensive record of the Pacific theater's naval warfare during the Second World War. Mainly focused on the submariner experiences, I wondered why he chose this for me, but after getting started on the 1,071 page tome, it became a most interesting read about the men and machines of the sub service. My younger brother would help himself to read it, and eventually he became a submariner himself. I still will grab it to read myself to sleep, some 40 years on. My retired escort friend in Miami and I are working our way through the Augusten Burroughs works,discussing-as a book club- after each one and I've just ordered through the reopened library system here a copy of "Hillbilly Elegy".

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I did a great deal of reading in my younger years. Sadly with the amount of reading I do at the office, it has lost some of its appeal. Luckily I have rediscovered the joy of a good story by listening to audio books. The New York City Library has an excellent selection that can be downloaded to an app on your phone or tablet. I tend to enjoy biographies and fiction. Currently working my way through the Cormoran Strike novel series written by Robert Galbraith (a pseudonym for J. K Rowling).?

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As anybody who knows me well, knows reading is one of the great joys of my life. I read constantly, frequently two or three books at a time. Thus I’m always looking for new things to read. I frequently get fixated on a topic and attempt to ready everything I can find regarding it – that explains the nine book I have recently read on The Battle of Midway. There are actually two more that I want to read but they are both way out of print and very expensive. Knowing me I will eventually spring for the money because I WANT to read the books.

SO WHAT ARE YOU GUYS READING?

 

I have read these Midway books and greatly enjoyed them:

 

Boreneman, Walter R., “The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King – The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea”.

Buell, Thomas B., “The Quiet Warrior: A Biography of Admiral Raymond A. Spruance”.

Carlson, Elliot, “Joe Rochefort’s War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway”.

Kleiss, N. Jack “Dusty Kleiss, “Never Call Me a Hero: A Legendary American Dive-Bomber Pilot Remembers the Battle of Midway”.

Martell, Ronald E., Showdown in the Pacific War: Nimitz and Yamamoto”.

Potter, E.B., “Nimitz”.

Prange, Gordon W., “Miracle at Midway”.

Rigby, David, “Air Group Commander Wade McClusky and the Battle of Midway”.

Symonds, Craig L., “The Battle of Midway”.

 

I’ve also recently read and enjoyed:

 

Kaufman, Jonathan, “The Last Kings of Shanghai: The Rival Jewish Dynasties that Helped Create Modern China”.

McGrath, Tim: “James Monroe: A Life”.

 

I am about to read:

 

Penn, Thomas, “A Royal Tragedy: The Brothers York”.

Santopietro, Tom, “Considering Doris Day”.

Combining your 'love' and 'hate' threads today. I often read for a good hour while walking laps around the track, don't have to worry about paying attention to your surroundings on the track

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Lately wildlife books, especially Grizzlies and wolves by authors who spend part of their lives studying those animals in the United States National Parks in the West and Alaska

 

A

 

These kinds of books are right up my alley too. If you have some recommendations for specific titles, I'd love to hear them.

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Bruce Ackerman's The Failure of the Founding Fathers, about all the poorly thought out details that the 1787 convention included in the Constitution, as well as the details they should have included but didn't. His thesis is that the founders wrote a document that assumed there wouldn't be political parties in the new country, and therefore failed to adequately accommodate the two party system that developed almost immediately. It helps to have some background in political science and the history of the period to follow his arguments, but it is a sharp analysis.

Edited by Charlie
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FreshFluff, like you, up until recently my WWII interest has centered around the European theatre. However, I recently saw the Emmerich/Woody Harrelson film Midway which picked my interest in learning more about that battle. My entire life has been spent overdoing things, thus the nine books on Midway. After I finish the books on my current list I plan to finish reading Richard J. Evans' "The Third Reich at War". I have enjoyed what little I have already read and am thus looking forward to finishing it.

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FreshFluff, like you, up until recently my WWII interest has centered around the European theatre. However, I recently saw the Emmerich/Woody Harrelson film Midway which picked my interest in learning more about that battle. My entire life has been spent overdoing things, thus the nine books on Midway. After I finish the books on my current list I plan to finish reading Richard J. Evans' "The Third Reich at War". I have enjoyed what little I have already read and am thus looking forward to finishing it.

 

I read Richard J. Evans' book when I audited Second World War courses at the University of Pennsylvania a decade ago. The professor was Tom Childers who has written several excellent books on Germany in 1930s and 1940s. I enjoyed talking to Childers and occasionally the students, who are smarter than I. But I did because friends with several students. I have mentioned before that the student I knew the best was killed in South Sudan. (He became an excellent journalist.)

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In the home stretch of The Lincoln Conspiracy by Brad Meltzer and John Mensch - extremely well-written and interesting.

Next on the list is The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich - I have read it before tho not for at least 25 years and used it as a "child" for my Evelyn

Wood Speed-reading class in the '60's. I seem to have an unholy interest in how truly evil humankind can be. I find Nazism and its proponents to be supremely fascinating.

 

However, after that is done, I have already printed Epigonos' list (is the apostrophe in the correct position - forgive me Donald Trump, Jr.) ?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mysterys and Crime. My friends uncle is mystery writer Vincent Lardo. He took over the Lawrence Sanders series of The Deadly Sins series..Mc Nally Series...and more. I've read almost all...but have a few more. Good story about him..but a different category

Thank you for mentioning these - I just finished the first book in the McNally series; quite enjoyed it. I do think my next book should be non fiction... lol ?

 

worst-book-covers-titles-45.jpg

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Mysterys and Crime. My friends uncle is mystery writer Vincent Lardo. He took over the Lawrence Sanders series of The Deadly Sins series..Mc Nally Series...and more. I've read almost all...but have a few more. Good story about him..but a different category

Thank you for mentioning these - I just finished the first book in the McNally series; quite enjoyed it. I do think my next book should be non fiction... lol ?

 

worst-book-covers-titles-45.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

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